What Is The Joe Lieberman Encyclopedia All About?
Joe Lieberman made a lot of claims during his 2006 re-election campaign, many of which had no resemblence to his record. This site, and image linked in this box, serves as a resource for all bloggers/reporters suffering through Joe's penchant for revisionist history over the next six years.

Friday, November 14, 2008

Joe Lieberman Oppo Book

This site never came together the way I had hoped it would, but I promise to fix it -- especially if Joe remains in the caucus and is allowed to keep his gavel. Until then, here is my Joe Lieberman oppo book from the 2006 campaign. Proudly, Tim


IRAQ 3

SOCIAL SECURITY 7

MEDICARE AND MEDICAID 9

DRUG COMPANIES 16

EDUCATION 18

VETERANS / NATIONAL GUARD 20

ENVIRONMENT 25

FREE TRADE 27

HADASSAH LIEBERMAN 36

FLIP-FLOPS, HYPOCRISY AND BROKEN PROMISES 38

1988 CAMPAIGN 42

SMALL BUSINESS 49

ATTENDANCE AND MISSED VOTES 52

PROPERTY 87

CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS 92



IRAQ

Lieberman’s position on Iraq has clearly been and will continue to be the most important issue of the 2006 campaign. His support for the administration, including his willingness to repeat President Bush’s false rhetoric of progress and victory in Iraq, his opposition to creating a timetable to withdraw military forces from Iraq and his resistance to holding the President accountable for the failed strategy in the Middle East, has given his opponents ample opportunities for criticism.

Lieberman continues to spout Bush Administration lines on Iraq. Similar to President Bush’s now-infamous “Mission Accomplished” speech, Lieberman stood with military families at a press conference declaring that the U.S. had won a “spectacular victory” in Iraq and that “hostility” was over. Lieberman also continues to argue that the American people are safer as a result of the war, yet increasing terrorism threats have led many former military officers and national security officials to declare otherwise. He has been a strict opponent of specific plans to withdraw troops, arguing instead that “the president’s plan for victory is working.”

Lieberman’s inconsistent position on Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld is of note. While he called for Rumsfeld’s resignation during his presidential campaign in late 2003, he declared his support for the Secretary of Defense in May 2004, after his campaign was over. On August 20, Lieberman flipped his position again after his loss in the Democratic Primary, renewing his call for Rumsfeld’s resignation.

FALSE RHETORIC

• Lieberman said the U.S. had won a “spectacular victory” in Iraq and that the “hostility” was over. At a press conference with the families of members of the military serving in Iraq, Lieberman announced an end to major fighting in Iraq, saying the “hostility” was over. “The American military has won an extraordinary, spectacular victory that should make every American proud,” Lieberman said. He added that the U.S. victory signaled an end to the threat of Saddam Hussein and chemical and biological weapons and freed the Iraqi people. (Hartford Courant, 4/15/03; Associated Press, 4/15/03)

• Lieberman said the American people would be safer because of the war in Iraq. “Saddam Hussein was a threat to the United States and, most particularly, to his neighbors,” Lieberman said. “We did the right thing in fighting this fight, and the American people will be safer as a result of it.” (Associated Press, 5/3/03)

“I’m absolutely convinced the American people, the people of the region, are going to be a lot safer with [Saddam Hussein] gone,” Lieberman said. “There is no question that he was supporting terrorism.” (Associated Press, 6/5/03)

• Lieberman said that taking down Saddam Hussein saved “maybe hundreds of thousands of Americans.” “The truth is, with Saddam Hussein gone, I believe we have saved the lives of thousands, maybe tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands of Americans, who eventually he would have brought to death,” Lieberman said. “I believe I know evil. This guy was evil. I worried that the time would come that if we didn’t knock him down, kick him out, that he would sponsor some horrific act against the American people, like Sept. 11.” (Associated Press, 12/15/03)

• Lieberman praised “progress” in Iraq after an interim constitution was adopted. “I am convinced America is safer with Saddam Hussein out of power and in prison,” Lieberman said. “I am very grateful for the progress that has occurred, particularly now with an interim constitution and a movement toward elections and a transfer of power.” (Connecticut Post, 3/14/04)

• Lieberman said that President Bush’s plan in Iraq was working. “The president’s plan for victory is working,” he said. “The president’s plan for victory is going to take time. The troops will come home when the president’s plan for victory succeeds. Democracy in Iraq is on the march. We will never cut and run.” (Hartford Courant, 12/14/05)

STAYING THE COURSE

• Lieberman claimed, “We’re on the road to peace and democracy in Iraq.” “The president spoke about the importance of completing our mission in Iraq, and I couldn’t agree more,” he said. “Americans disagree about whether we should have gone to war or not, but we can all agree now that we must win and we must support our troops. We’re on the road to peace and democracy in Iraq, and we’ll reach our goal, if we stick to it.” (Associated Press, 2/2/05)

• Lieberman praised progress in Iraq in a Wall Street Journal op-ed. “The progress in Iraq is visible and practical,” he said. “And, I am convinced, almost all of the progress in Iraq and throughout the Middle East will be lost if those forces are withdrawn faster than the Iraqi military is capable of securing the country. . . Does America have a good plan for doing this, a strategy for victory in Iraq? Yes we do.” (Office of Sen. Lieberman Press Release, 11/29/05)

• Lieberman cautioned against withdrawing from Iraq, predicting civil war if done prematurely. “If we withdraw prematurely from Iraq, there will be civil war, and there is great probability that others in the neighborhood will come in. . . There will be instability in the Middle East, and the hope of creating a different model for a better life in the Middle East in this historic center of the Arab world, Iraq, will be gone.” (Office of Sen. Lieberman Press Release, 11/15/05)

• Lieberman opposed Democratic proposals calling for withdrawal from Iraq. “That will actually encourage the terrorists to accelerate their cruel and inhumane attacks, and it will unsettle the sectarian groups to hunker down and rearm their militias to strengthen themselves for the civil war that they feel will follow a premature American retreat,” Lieberman said. (Connecticut Post, 6/23/06)

• Lieberman questioned an “abrupt” withdrawal “based on the calendar.” “The situation in Iraq is very difficult and full of peril. Violence is high, sectarian strife alarming and reconstruction unsatisfactory. But an abrupt withdrawal from Iraq based on the calendar rather than conditions would create an unacceptable risk of Iraq becoming a truly failed state and drawing its neighbors, such as Iran, Turkey, Jordan, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia into a regional crisis,” Lieberman wrote in a Hartford Courant questionnaire response. “Given the high stakes for our own security, I believe that we must continue our support, but make it clear to the Iraqis that we cannot and will not stay in Iraq indefinitely.” (Hartford Courant, 8/6/06)

• Lieberman said that the U.S. had a “choice” between a free and independent Iraq or “abandoning them and letting the terrorists take over.” “My position on Iraq has been clear and I believe it was the right thing for us to overthrow Saddam Hussein,” he said. “I’ve been critical of the things the administration did after that, but the fact is that we’re there now and we have a choice, and that choice is between helping the Iraqis achieve a free and independent Iraq or abandoning them and letting the terrorists take over.” (Connecticut Post, 7/7/06)

VOTING FOR THE ADMINISTRATION STRATEGY

• Lieberman voted to authorize President Bush to use force in Iraq. He voted for the resolution that authorized the use of force against Iraq. The resolution passed the Senate by a 77-23 margin. (H J Res 114, Senate Vote 237, 10/11/02) Lieberman even sponsored the Senate resolution that was incorporated modifications to the use-of-force resolution passed by both chambers. (S J Res 46, 107th Congress)

• Lieberman voted against requiring the President to submit a report to Congress on the U.S. strategy in Iraq. Sponsored by Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy, the amendment required that the report include an estimate on the number of troops serving in 18 months and what percentage of those forces would be members of the National Guard or Army Reserves. Lieberman was one of only two Democrats to vote against the amendment. (S 2400, Senate Vote 138, 6/23/04)

• Lieberman voted against a timetable for withdrawal from Iraq. Lieberman voted against the Levin, D-MI, amendment that stated that U.S. military forces should not stay in Iraq indefinitely and required the president to report to Congress within 30 days of the bill’s enactment with a timetable for withdrawal and a campaign plan, including dates, outlining phased redeployment of U.S. troops from Iraq. (S 1042, Senate Vote 322, 11/15/05)

• Lieberman voted against withdrawing troops from Iraq by July 1, 2007. Lieberman voted against an amendment that required the President to begin redeploying U.S. troops from Iraq in 2006 and to complete the withdrawal by July 1, 2007, according to a schedule coordinated with the Iraqi government. It stipulated that only the minimal number of forces needed to train Iraqi security forces, launch targeted counterterrorism attacks and protect the forces could remain in Iraq. (S 2766, Senate Vote 181, 6/22/06)

• Lieberman voted against a timetable for withdrawal from Iraq. Lieberman voted against the Levin, D-MI, amendment that expressed the sense of Congress urging the president to begin phased redeployment of U.S. troops from Iraq starting in 2006 and to submit to Congress by the end of 2006 a plan with estimated dates for continued phased withdrawal. (S 2766, Senate Vote 182, 6/22/06)

FLIP-FLOP ON RUMSFELD

• Lieberman flip-flopped on calling for Donald Rumsfeld’s resignation.

o October 2003: “And the worst thing about Don Rumsfeld’s time at the Pentagon, the uniform military feel deeply that he doesn’t respect them, doesn’t listen to them. That – that’s not the kind of relationship that we need between a secretary of defense and the military. Judgment about whether he stays or not is up to President Bush, but if I were president, I’d – I’d get a new secretary of defense.” (CBS News: Face the Nation, 10/26/03)

o May 2004: “Donald Rumsfeld’s removal would delight foreign and domestic opponents of America’s presence in Iraq.” (Associated Press, 5/14/04) “Unless there is clear evidence connecting him to the wrongdoing, it is neither sensible nor fair to force the resignation of the secretary of defense, who clearly retains the confidence of the commander in chief, in the midst of a war.” (Wall Street Journal, 5/14/04)

o August 2006: “I think it’s still time for new leadership at the Pentagon . . . With all respect to Don Rumsfeld, who has done a grueling job for six years, we would benefit from new leadership to work with our military in Iraq.” (Associated Press, 8/20/06)


SOCIAL SECURITY

Lieberman’s shift away from support of privatization is a clear example of hypocrisy on his part. While he has shifted toward the Democratic position against personal retirement accounts, his change only came about at the time he was chosen as Al Gore’s running mate. In 1996, Lieberman voted to support an amendment that called for privatization of Social Security. In 1998, Lieberman called privatization “innovative” and said that it “has to happen.” But upon joining the Democratic ticket in 2000, Lieberman immediately backtracked on the issue and emphasized opposition to George W. Bush’s plans on Social Security. Lieberman even issued a previously unpublished op-ed titled, “My Private Journey Away from Privatization.”

On the same 1996 vote in support of privatization, Lieberman voted to support gradually increasing the retirement age to 70. When questioned if he still supported the measure in 2000, Lieberman said he would keep the idea “on the table” for future consideration.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman voted to privatize Social Security. He voted to support a budget resolution amendment that expressed the sense of the Senate that workers should be able to divert two percent of their Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes into personal investment plans. (S Con Res 57, Senate Vote 149, 5/23/96)

• In 1998, Lieberman said privatization of Social Security “has to happen.” In an interview with the San Diego News-Tribune editorial board, Lieberman expressed his support for privatization. “A remarkable wave of innovative thinking is advancing the concept of privatization, some personalization of retirement plans,” he said. “There is some risk obviously, but each of us has made a judgment about this in our own lives. . . . Not everybody supports this. We’re going to see again a kind of old Democratic Party/new Democratic Party kind of split on this. I think in the end that individual control of part of the retirement/Social Security funds has to happen.” (Copley News Service, 5/4/98)

• Lieberman flip-flopped on Social Security privatization when he was selected as Al Gore’s running mate. Lieberman was criticized in a 2000 column by Libertarian columnist Jacob Sullum for his compromised position:

Joe Lieberman’s integrity did not last long. Barely a week after he was picked for the Democratic ticket, the Connecticut senator had renounced most of the positions that made him an interesting choice. By the time you read this, he may have given up the rest.

First to go was Social Security reform. In 1998, Mr. Lieberman said, “A remarkable wave of innovative thinking is advancing the concept of privatization . . .” Now that he is teamed up with Al Gore, who condemns as a “risky scheme” what Mr. Lieberman once though necessary and inevitable, the senator is having second thoughts. “Ultimately,” he says in an unpublished op-ed piece circulated by his staff, “I turned away from privatization because the promises and the numbers supporting them don’t add up.” (Washington Times, 8/24/00)

• Lieberman voted to increase the retirement age for Social Security. On the same vote expressing support for privatization, Lieberman voted for an increase in the civil and military service retirement age and a limit in cost of living adjustments for high civilian and military pensions. The legislation also gradually adjusted the eligibility age for Social Security retirement to 70 years by the year 2030 in two-month increments. (S Con Res 57, Senate Vote 149, 5/23/96)

• Lieberman said he would consider supporting an increase in the retirement age in the future. In an interview with NBC’s Tim Russert, Lieberman was asked if he was abandoning the idea of raising the retirement age. “I think we may have to come back, but we don’t have do it now because the surplus has given us . . . We should keep it on the table for the good reason that people are living longer.” (NBC News: Meet the Press, 8/13/00)

SOCIAL SECURITY LEGISLATION

Lieberman Voted to Support Social Security Privatization and Increase the Retirement Age to 70

S Con Res 57 Senate Vote 149 R: 32-20; D 31-16 5/23/96

Lieberman voted against the Grassley, R-IA, motion to table the Kerrey, D-NE, amendment to express the sense of the Senate that the age for civil and military service retirement benefits should be increased; that the age for Medicare benefits should be increased to correspond to Social Security benefits; that cost of living adjustments should be made only for civilian and military pensions that do not exceed $50,000; that workers should be able to divert two percent of their Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes into personal investment plans; and that the Consumer Price Index should be reduced by 0.5 percent. The Kerrey amendment also expressed the sense of the Senate that the eligibility age for Social Security retirement should be gradually adjusted to 70 years by the year 2030 in two-month increments. LIEBERMAN VOTED AGAINST THE MOTION TO TABLE.

Lieberman Cosponsored and Voted For Legislation to Slow the Growth of Social Security Benefits

S Con Res 57 Senate Vote 150 R 22-30: D 24-23 5/23/96

Lieberman voted for the Chafee, R-RI, substitute amendment to save $679 billion over seven years and provide for a balanced budget by 2003. The substitute reduced projected spending over seven years for Medicare by $154 billion, Medicaid by $62 billion, welfare by $58 billion and discretionary spending by $268 billion. The substitute included a net $105 billion in tax cuts and saved $126 billion by adjusting the Consumer Price Index and $25 billion by eliminating certain tax preferences. LIEBERMAN VOTED FOR THE SUBSTITUTE.
MEDICARE AND MEDICAID

Lieberman’s record on Medicare includes several votes against the best interests of the program’s recipients. He supported increasing the Medicare eligibility age. He voted for proposals to raise the age to 67 and expressed support for a minimum age as high as 70. Lieberman also voted against an amendment that expressed the sense of the Senate that Medicare reductions should not increase costs for its recipients or diminish access to health care. Lieberman was also one of just six Democrats to vote against a measure to allow Medicare recipients to choose their own doctors.

With respect to the Medicare prescription drug benefit, Lieberman has attempted to take multiple sides on the issue. In 1999, he opposed the benefit as “costly.” In 2003, he expressed concern with the bill but said he would have voted for it. Instead, he missed the June 2003 vote and would later miss the final November vote on the plan while campaigning for President.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman voted against protecting Medicare recipients from higher health care costs. He voted against an amendment that expressed the sense of the Senate that Medicare reductions should not increase costs for recipients or diminish access to health care. He was one of only six Democrats to oppose the amendment, which was sponsored by Ted Kennedy. (S Con Res 13, Senate Vote 218, 5/25/95)

• Lieberman voted against allowing Medicare recipients to choose their own doctors. He voted was one of six Democrats to vote against requiring HMOs to offer a plan to Medicare participants that allowed them to select non-HMO doctors and services. (S 1357, Senate Vote 508, 10/26/95)

• Lieberman voted to increase the Medicare eligibility age. Lieberman voted to support legislation that gradually raised the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67 between 2003 and 2027. (S 947, Senate Vote 112, 6/24/97) He had proposed raising the minimum eligibility age to as high as 70, before backing away from the idea upon being chosen as Al Gore’s running mate in 2000. (Associated Press, 8/13/00)

• Lieberman criticized plans for a Medicare prescription drug benefit and missed the final vote to establish the program. In 1999, he said that Medicare should not be loaded up with the costly prescription drug benefit. (Associated Press, 8/17/00) While he expressed concern with the Bush Medicare reform plan in 2003, he was absent when the bill was considered by the Senate for approval. Lieberman said he would have voted for the bill, however. Lieberman went on to miss the final approval of the conference report in November as well. (Associated Press, 6/27/03; S 1, Senate Vote 262, 6/27/03; HR 1, Senate Vote 459, 11/25/03)

MEDICARE AND MEDICAID LEGISLATION

Lieberman Voted Against Stating Opposition to Increasing Costs or Reducing Benefits for Medicare Recipients

S Con Res 13 Senate Vote 218 R 52-2; D 6-39 5/25/95

Lieberman voted for the Domenici, R-N.M., motion to table the Kennedy, D-Mass., amendment to express the sense of the Senate that reductions in Medicare spending should not increase medical costs for recipients or diminish access to health care and that major reductions should not be enacted except in the context of broad bipartisan health care reform. The Senate agreed to the motion 58-41.

Lieberman Opposed Requiring HMOs to Offer Medicare Recipients a Choice of Doctors

S 1357 Senate Vote 508 R 39-14; D 40-6 10/26/95

Lieberman voted against the Helms, R-N.C., amendment to require health maintenance organizations to offer a plan to Medicare participants that allows them to select non-HMO doctors and services. The Senate adopted the amendment 79-20.

Lieberman Opposed Restoring Medicare Spending

S 1357 Senate Vote 526 R 0-53; D 43-3 10/27/95

Lieberman voted against the Exon, D-Neb., motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Domenici, R-N.M., point of order against the Baucus amendment for violating the Budget Act. The Baucus amendment restored Medicare spending by cutting the reduction in the capital gains tax rate for corporations and scaling back tax cuts in the bill. The Senate rejected the motion 43-56.

Lieberman Opposed Reducing Cuts to Medicare and Medicaid

S 1357 Senate Vote 529 R 52-1; D 3-43 10/27/95

Lieberman voted for the Domenici, R-N.M., motion to table the Lautenberg, D-N.J., amendment to eliminate tax breaks in the Fiscal 1996 Budget for taxpayers who earn more than $1 million per year and to use the savings to reduce proposed cuts in Medicare and Medicaid. The Senate agreed to the motion 55-44.

Lieberman Voted to Cut Medicare and Medicaid Spending

S Con Res 57 Senate Vote 150 R 22-30; D 24-23 5/23/96

Lieberman voted for the Fiscal 1997 Budget Resolution/Centrist Coalition Alternative. The Chafee, R-R.I., substitute amendment saved $679 billion over seven years and provided for a balanced budget by 2003. The substitute reduced projected spending over seven years for Medicare by $154 billion, Medicaid by $62 billion, welfare by $58 billion and discretionary spending by $268 billion. The substitute included a net $105 billion in tax cuts, saved $126 billion by adjusting the Consumer Price Index and $25 billion by eliminating certain tax preferences. The Senate rejected the amendment 46-53.

Lieberman Supported Banning Legal Immigrants from Receiving Medicaid Coverage

S 1956 Senate Vote 228 R 4-48; D 31-16 6/23/96

Lieberman voted against the Exon, D-Neb., motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Domenici, R-N.M., point of order against the Kennedy, D-Mass., amendment for violating the Budget Act. The amendment delayed for two years the provisions of the welfare overhaul bill that banned legal immigrants from Medicaid coverage for five years, and after that only allow Medicaid if their sponsor's income is too low to assist them. The Senate rejected the motion 35-64.

Lieberman Voted to Increase the Medicare Eligibility Age

S 947 Senate Vote 112 R 50-5; D 12-33 6/24/97

Lieberman voted for the Roth, R-Del., motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Durbin, D-Ill., point of order against a provision that would gradually raise the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67 between 2003 and 2027. The Senate agreed to the motion 62-38.

Lieberman Voted to Impose Copayments for Medicare Home Health

S 947 Senate Vote 111 R 50-5; D 9-36 6/24/97

Lieberman voted for the Roth, R-Del., motion to table the Kennedy, D-Mass., amendment to the Fiscal 1998 Budget that struck the section imposing a $5 copayment for some Medicare home health visits. The Senate agreed to the motion 59-41.

Lieberman Voted to Implement Medicare Means Testing

S 947 Senate Vote 113 R 49-6; D 21-24 6/24/97

Lieberman voted for the Roth, R-Del., motion to table the Kennedy, D-Mass., amendment to strike the section of the Fiscal 1998 Budget that introduced a means-based formula to determine insurance deductibles under Medicare Part B. The Senate agreed to the motion 70-30.

Lieberman Opposed Delaying the Implementation of Medicare Means Testing

S 947 Senate Vote 114 R 7-48; D 30-15 6/24/97

Lieberman voted against the Kennedy, D-Mass., motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Domenici, R-N.M., point of order against the Kennedy amendment to delay means testing under Medicare Part B until January 2000. The Senate rejected the motion 37-63.

Lieberman Opposed Removing Medicare Age Increases and Means Testing from the Budget

S 947 Senate Vote 115 R 0-55; D 25-20 6/25/97

Lieberman voted against the Reed, D-R.I., motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Domenici, R-N.M., point of order against the Reed substitute amendment to eliminate the age increase for Medicare eligibility, remove the $5 copayment for home health care visits and eliminate Medicare means testing. The Senate rejected the motion 25-75.

Lieberman Voted to Allow Physicians to Enter Into Private Contracts with Medicare Beneficiaries

S 947 Senate Vote 120 R 55-0; D 9-35 6/25/97

Lieberman voted for the Kyl, R-Ariz., motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Lautenberg, D-N.J., point of order against the Kyl amendment to allow physicians to enter into private contracts with Medicare beneficiaries if claims have not been filed for services. The administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration was required to report to Congress on the provision by Oct. 1, 2001. The Senate agreed to the motion 64-35.

Lieberman Voted to Cut Medicare Growth and Increase the Eligibility Age

S 947 Senate Vote 130 R 52-3; D 21-24 6/25/97

Lieberman voted for passage of a bill that cut spending by $135.9 billion between fiscal 1998 and fiscal 2002. The bill cut the growth of Medicare by about $115 billion, gradually increased the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67 between 2003 and 2027 and introduced means-based testing to determine premiums under Medicare Part B. It cut Medicaid spending by $13.6 billion, boosted spending on children's health care by $16 billion. As part of the children's health initiative, the use of federal funds for abortions was prohibited except in cases of rape or incest, or when a woman's life is threatened. The Senate passed the bill 73-27.


Lieberman Missed Voting on Establishing a Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit

S 1 Senate Vote 262 R 40-10; D 35-11 6/27/03

Lieberman was absent for the final vote on passage of the bill that authorized $400 billion over 10 years to create a prescription drug benefit for Medicare recipients beginning in 2006. The Senate passed the bill 76-21.

KEY MEDICARE AND MEDICAID PRESS

Lieberman opposed a new congressional formula for distributing federal Medicaid money that was part of the House Republican's reform proposal. The formula established block grants to the states and could have resulted in Connecticut receiving billions of dollars less in funding. Jim Kennedy, Lieberman’s spokesman, quoted Lieberman as saying, “I'm very troubled” by the formula. “Medicaid does need reform . . . but this proposal is bad for Connecticut.” At the same time, Lieberman criticized fellow Democrats for being “too defensive about the status quo” while seeking to protect Medicare. (Hartford Courant, 9/21/95; 9/28/95)

Lieberman changed his position on raising the minimum eligibility age for Medicare from 65 to 70. Lieberman said that at one time he refused to dismiss the idea because Medicare’s financial situation was so dire but that he now felt that was not necessary. (Associated Press, 8/13/00)

In 1999, Lieberman criticized plans for a Medicare prescription drug benefit, saying the program shouldn’t be loaded up with something so costly. (Associated Press, 8/17/00)

Lieberman said that with the prices of prescription drugs increasing and the number of baby boomers entering the Medicare system expected to skyrocket, “that's not just a price crisis in my opinion. It is a prescription for a humanitarian crisis.” (Associated Press, 9/26/00)

In response to a candidate questionnaire asking if he thought that a prescription drug benefit program for seniors should be managed by Medicare or private insurers, Lieberman said, “Senior citizens should not have to choose between paying for medicine and putting food on the table. They deserve a prescription drug benefit that is universal, affordable and dependable, and the best way to guarantee that is by administering it through Medicare. That’s why I have supported legislation to improve Medicare by providing a universal and affordable prescription drug benefit.” (Hartford Courant, 10/15/00)

Lieberman said that the Bush administration’s plan to reform Medicaid was “irresponsible and unworkable” and “would further strain fiscally strapped states and endanger the health care safety net for 15 million poor, elderly and disabled Americans who depend on Medicaid.” Bush had proposed giving states up to $3.25 billion in federal Medicaid funding for fiscal year 2004 if they agreed to strict caps on federal Medicaid funding for future years. (Connecticut Post, 2/25/03)

In January 2003, Lieberman (and John Kerry) missed a Senate vote on a budget amendment to increase funding for education and Medicaid. The amendment lost by two votes. (Associated Press, 4/21/03)

Lieberman signed a pledge committing to push for revamping the Medicare system. “There’s a good case made here,” Lieberman said. “I think there’s a good claim here.”
Lieberman signed a formal pledge offered by Democratic Rep. Leonard Boswell to all nine candidates seeking the Democratic presidential nomination. In that pledge, candidates were asked to acknowledge that disparities exist in the Medicare reimbursement system and they agree to push for changes. “I hereby pledge to address that inequity by working to narrow the gap in reimbursement rates,” the pledge said. (Associated Press, 5/26/03)

On June 24, 2003, Lieberman missed a vote on an amendment by Senate colleague Chris Dodd to allow open enrollment in Medicare drug plans through 2008. Lieberman was present for a morning vote on a Democratic bid to protect drug coverage offered by employee retirement plans. That effort was defeated 52-43; Lieberman sided with the Democrats. But he had departed when Dodd's measure came up early in the afternoon and lost 55-42. The three senators not voting were presidential rivals Lieberman, Bob Graham of Florida and John Kerry of Massachusetts. Lieberman's campaign said he was missing votes where the outcome was not in doubt, and hoped to be back for the final vote on Medicare reform. (Hartford Courant, 6/25/03)

Lieberman missed the final vote on the Medicare prescription drug program. In a statement, Lieberman said he would have voted for the bill, calling it a “first step to answering the prayers of our seniors.” But, he added, “my vote is not an enthusiastic endorsement; we cannot ignore the substantial weaknesses in this proposal. It has an enormous gap in coverage that leaves millions of low-income seniors without the help they need.” Lieberman campaign spokesman Jano Cabrera said the senator took a gamble that the Senate debate would drag on through the night, enabling him to get back in time to vote Friday morning. Cabrera said missing the vote would not be a problem for Lieberman because “the senator has made it clear that this is an issue ... he has a long record of support on. There isn't anyone who would doubt his commitment on this issue, his record speaks for itself.” (Associated Press, 6/27/03)

Lieberman said that Medicare reforms were needed so that future Social Security increases would not be swallowed up by Medicare premium hikes. “This makes it even more critical that we pass a prescription drug bill that will help seniors who are struggling to pay for drugs,” Lieberman said. (Connecticut Post, 10/17/03)

Lieberman said he would vote against a Medicare prescription drug bill that linked benefit costs to income. Lieberman also said he would “probably” support a filibuster on the bill if means testing was included when the conference committee brought out its compromise package. “I don't like means testing,” Lieberman said. “I would consider that to be a specific step back from the Senate bill and therefore I would not support it.” (Associated Press, 10/22/03)

Asked about the rising cost of prescription drugs, Lieberman defended his support of the Medicare prescription drug bill. “It wasn't what I would've written. What I would've written would've covered more people,” he said. “But it was a good plan and a step forward ... so I supported it. I believe I was the only one of the presidential candidates who supported it. Teddy Kennedy supported it, so I figured if it was good enough for him, it was good enough for me because he's a great advocate for the elderly.” (Associated Press, 11/10/03)


DRUG COMPANIES

Lieberman, who has received more than $400,000 in campaign contributions from drug companies over his Senate career, has been described in the media as a potential “weapon” for the industry. His record shows some truth to the label. In addition to supporting funding for research, Lieberman has sponsored and voted for legislation to extend patent protection of profitable drugs for the pharmaceutical industry. Lieberman also opposed a measure to enact price controls on prescription drugs.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman sponsored legislation that extended patent protections for drug companies that develop defenses against biological weapons. Along with Republican Senators Orrin Hatch and Sam Brownback, Lieberman was a sponsor of “BioShield” legislation, which included a “wild-card patent extension” potentially worth billions by shielding a drug company’s products from generic competition for up to 18 months. (Washington Post, 8/7/05)

• Lieberman voted to support three-year patent extensions for drug companies. In 1995, Lieberman voted against Senate efforts to eliminate a provision in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade that allowed drug companies to extend patents on prescription drugs from 17 to 20 years. (HR 1833, Senate Vote 594, 12/7/95)

• Lieberman voted against federally regulated price controls on prescription drugs. He voted to table an amendment that required drug makers to agree to sell patented products at a price determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. (HR 4577, Senate Vote 168, 6/30/00)

• A columnist in 2000 indicated that Lieberman was “a consistent supporter of the industry.” In the publication Medical Marketing & Media, contributor Carl Seiden described Lieberman’s support of the drug companies’ agenda. “[Gore’s] running mate, Senator Lieberman, on the other hand, is a consistent supporter of the industry who has been a keynote speaker at PhRMA meetings and has a voting record that is very pro-research,” Seiden wrote. (Medical Marketing & Media, 10/1/00)

• Lieberman has flown on Pfizer’s corporate jet. In an August 2000 profile of drug industry lobbying, Lieberman was described as a potential “weapon” for the pharmaceutical industry. It was also reported that Lieberman had flown on the Pfizer jet and accepted $161,000 in drug company money over an eight-year period. Minneapolis Star-Tribune writers Greg Gordon and Kristin Gustafson wrote, “While Lieberman, D-Conn., hasn’t always sided with the drug makers, Congressional watchdogs say their relationship with Al Gore’s vice presidential pick could be just one more weapon as the industry prepares to fight an expected election-year firestorm over soaring drug prices and calls to expand Medicare drug coverage.” (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, 8/27/00)

• Over his career, Lieberman has accepted more than $400,000 in campaign contributions from prescription drug makers. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, he has received $419,600 during his Senate career. Purdue Pharma has been his seventh-largest contributor, giving him $84,000, and Pfizer has been his 12th largest contributor, giving him $67,900 over his career. (Center for Responsive Politics)

PHARMACEUTICAL LEGISLATION

Lieberman Opposed Allowing Generic Drugs to Come to Market Faster

HR 1833 Senate Vote 594 R 12-40; D 36-9 12/7/95

Lieberman voted against the Pryor, D-Ark., motion to table the DeWine, R-Ohio, amendment to the Pryor amendment to express the sense of the Senate that the Judiciary Committee should hold hearings on the Pryor amendment. The Pryor amendment eliminated a provision of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade that allowed drug companies to extend patents on prescription drugs from 17 to 20 years, thus shielding them from generic drug competition for an additional three years. The Senate rejected the motion 48-49.

Lieberman Opposed Limiting Prices for Drugs Patented by the NIH

HR 4577 Senate Vote 168 R 48-6; D 8-33 6/30/00

Lieberman voted for the Specter, R-Pa., motion to table the Wellstone, D-Minn., amendment that required prescription drug producers to sign an agreement to sell products that are patented by the National Institutes of Health at a price determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. The Senate agreed to the motion 56-39.




EDUCATION

On education, Lieberman’s strong support of school vouchers is a clear example of holding onto policy that may not be in the best interests of Connecticut. While in the U.S. Senate, he voted to put millions into private school voucher programs. It is of note that in support of the legislation, Lieberman voted against amendments that sought to provide billions of dollars for reconstruction at thousands of schools across the country.

Despite his support of this issue, Lieberman shows that his conviction may not be as strong as it is made out to be. In 2000, he tempered his support for vouchers on the campaign trail as Al Gore’s running mate, saying, “I understand how this works when you are vice president.”

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman supports school vouchers. Lieberman voted for a $50 million school voucher program in 2001, and voted to fund a $1.8 billion voucher program for three years in 1999, paid for by cutting subsidies for ethanol, oil, gas and sugar. In 2000 he voted for a $100 million school choice program, tied to funds for school construction. (S 1, Senate Vote 179, 6/12/01; S 1429, Senate Vote 238, 6/30/99)

o Lieberman withdrew his support for vouchers to be Gore’s running mate. Lieberman said in 2000 after being selected as Al Gore’s running mate, “Bottom line? If you ask me personally, I'm still for a test of vouchers…But I understand how this works when you are vice president.” (Press Enterprise, 8/16/00)

• Lieberman supports education savings accounts. Lieberman voted in 1998 and 2000 for legislation that provided for tax-free accounts up to $2,000 per child annually for educational expenses for pre-kindergarten through high school for either public or private school expenses. In 1998, the bill also allowed married couples with combined income of up to $220,000, approximately twice the amount for a single parent, to participate in the education savings accounts. (HR 2646, Senate Vote 102, 4/23/98; S 1134, Senate Vote 33, 3/2/00)

o Education savings accounts have been criticized as a “backdoor voucher scheme.” Critics have called Education Savings Accounts a “backdoor voucher scheme” that takes taxpayer money away from public schools to private and religious schools. The National Education Association wrote that ESAs “disproportionately benefit affluent families and those with children already in private school, while doing little for the 90 percent of students in public schools.” (NEA Press Release, 2/13/01)

• Lieberman said he supported vouchers that “do not take away money from public schools.” Lieberman said in 2004, “I support private school voucher experiments that do not take away money from public schools, include full evaluations, and are targeted to help low-income students trapped in bad schools. It’s one way to help improve opportunities for low-income students immediately while we do the long, hard work of lifting up our public schools.” (Capital Times, 1/26/04)

o Lieberman supported education savings accounts over funding for public schools. Lieberman opposed proposals to fund school construction and help poorly performing schools instead of education savings accounts. He voted against legislation that provided $25 billion in tax credits for public school construction, and voted against providing $275 million to states for local districts to implement corrective actions to turn around poor-performing schools. Lieberman also voted against $1.2 billion to fund measures aimed at reducing class size, such as the recruiting and hiring of new teachers, testing new teachers, and providing professional development for teachers. (S 1134, Senate Vote 17, 19, 21, 3/1/00)

o Lieberman supported education savings accounts over funding for Pell Grants. Lieberman voted against a proposal to increase federal Pell Grants by $1.2 billion in place of education savings accounts. (S 1134, Senate Vote 29, 3/2/00)

• Lieberman opposed school construction funding. Lieberman voted against legislation to provide $5 billion to help $5 billion in revenue to help states and school districts repair and renovate dilapidated schools. He later voted against $10 billion in tax credits over ten years to fund school construction. He was one of just four Democrats to oppose the measures. (S Con Res 27, Senate Vote 79, 5/22/97; HR 2646, Senate Vote 90, 4/21/98)

o The 1998 measure provided $11 billion over 10 years for interest rate subsidies, enabling local school districts to reduce their capital costs significantly. The subsidies, in the form of tax credits to investors, would permit the issuance of $22 billion in bonds to build or repair 5,000 schools across the country. (Associated Press, 4/22/98)



VETERANS / NATIONAL GUARD

In his 18-year career, Lieberman has voted for a significant amount of funding increases for veterans’ benefits. There are some exceptions to this record, however. He has prioritized for other programs, such as Americorps and welfare spending, over increased funding for veterans. In 1997, he was one of just eight Democrats to vote against transferring $400 million from the Defense Department for veterans’ benefits. In addition, he opposed an amendment to increase the federal budget for veterans’ medical care by $650 million.

With respect to the National Guard, it is of note that Lieberman proposed a significant expansion of the duties of the already thinly-stretched National Guard that included keeping authority over the agency with the Pentagon.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman voted against funding for veteran’s benefits. In 1997, he was one of just eight Democrats to vote against an amendment sponsored by Paul Wellstone to transfer $400 million from the Defense Department to veteran’s benefits. (S 936, Senate Vote 168, 7/10/97)

• Lieberman voted against increasing funding for veterans’ medical care in the federal budget. He voted against a budget amendment that appropriated $84.1 billion to the Departments of Veterans’ Affairs and Housing and Urban Development. Funding for veterans’ medical care was increased by $650 million. (HR 2620, Senate Vote 263, 8/1/01)

• Lieberman called for an expansion of the National Guard’s role domestically. “For homeland security to be all it can be, the National Guard has to be all it can be,” Lieberman said. His plan called for the National Guard to remain under the Pentagon and directed the National Guard to take a lead role in prevention and protection domestically while providing assistance to first responder efforts in domestic emergencies. (Hartford Courant, 6/27/02)

VETERANS LEGISLATION

Lieberman Opposed Cutting Welfare Spending to Increase Funding for Veterans Health Care

S Con Res 57 Senate Vote 116 R 52-0; D 23-23 5/16/96

Lieberman voted against the Bond, R-Mo., amendment to the Exon, D-Neb., substitute amendment, to increase veterans spending by $13 billion in fiscal 1997-2002, to be offset by reductions in welfare spending. The Senate adopted the amendment 75-23.


Lieberman Opposed $400 Million in Funding for Veterans Benefits

S 936 Senate Vote 168 R 50-5; D 8-36 7/10/97

Lieberman voted for the Thurmond, R-S.C., motion to table the Wellstone, D-Minn., amendment to require the Defense secretary to transfer $400 million to the secretary of Veteran’s Affairs in fiscal 1998 for veteran’s benefits. The Senate agreed to the motion 58-41.

Lieberman Opposed $329 Million for Veterans Health Care

S 2057 Senate vote 175 R 5-47; D 33-8 6/25/98

Lieberman voted against the Harkin, D-Iowa, amendment that transferred $329 million from defense accounts to the Veterans Affairs Department for health care programs. The amendment ordered the secretary of Defense to transfer the funds from defense programs that would result in the “least significant harm” to armed forces readiness and military personnel quality of life. The Senate rejected the amendment 38-55.

Lieberman Opposed Cutting Funds for the International Space Station to Fund Veterans’ Health Care

S 2168 Senate Vote 185 R 12-43; D 21-23 7/7/98

Lieberman voted against the Bumpers, D-Ark., amendment to the VA-HUD Appropriations Bill that eliminated the bill’s $2.3 billion appropriation for the international space station. The amendment provided $850 million to terminate the program, $1 billion for veterans’ health care programs and $450 million for low-income housing. The Senate rejected the amendment 33-66.

Lieberman Opposed Increasing Funding for Veterans’ Medical Care by $650 Million

HR 2620 Senate Vote 263 R 8-41; D 16-34 8/1/01

Lieberman voted against the Wellstone, D-Minn., motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Bond, R-Mo., point of order against the Wellstone amendment to the Mikulski, D-Md., substitute amendment. The Wellstone amendment increased the amount available for veterans’ medical care by $650 million. The substitute provided $84.1 billion for the departments of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and related agencies. The Senate rejected the motion 25-75.


Lieberman Missed a Vote on Supplemental Spending for Veterans Health Care

HR 2361 Senate Vote 165 R 52-0; D 43-0 6/29/05

Lieberman was absent for the vote on the Santorum, R-Pa., amendment to the Murray, D-Wash., amendment. The Santorum amendment appropriated $1.5 billion in supplemental fiscal 2005 funding to the Department of Veterans Affairs for medical services provided by the Veterans Health Administration. The Murray amendment appropriated $1.42 billion in supplemental fiscal 2005 funding for the same purpose. The Senate adopted the amendment 96-0.

Lieberman Missed a Vote on Providing $1.5 Billion in Funding for Veterans Health Care

HR 2361 Senate Vote 166 R 52-0; D 43-0 6/29/05

Lieberman was absent for the vote on the Murray, D-Wash., amendment to the Interior-Appropriations Bill. The amendment provided $1.5 billion in fiscal 2005 supplemental appropriations to the Department of Veterans Affairs for medical services provided by the Veterans Health Administration. The Senate adopted the amendment 96-0.

Lieberman Opposed $20 Million in Funding for Veterans Health Care to be Offset by Cuts to Americorps

HR 4939 Senate Vote 111 R 35-19; D 4-39 5/4/06

Lieberman voted against the Thune, R-S.D., amendment to the supplemental appropriations bill that added $20 million for veterans’ health care facilities. It offset the additional spending by striking $20 million in the underlying bill for AmeriCorps. The Senate rejected the amendment 39-59.

NATIONAL GUARD PRESS

Lieberman worked to help Connecticut National Guard units escape deep personnel cuts proposed by the first Bush administration. After meeting with Lt. Gen. John B. Conaway of the Pentagon’s National Guard Bureau, Sens. Christopher J. Dodd and Joseph I. Lieberman said they were satisfied that the cuts would be milder than feared and Connecticut units would be treated fairly. (Hartford Courant, 7/27/91)

Lieberman opposed cuts to the Connecticut National Guard. In 1992, the Pentagon planned to eliminate more than 2,673 National Guard positions in Connecticut, plus those of 163 Army and Navy reservists in the state. A spokesman for Lieberman said the cuts were being made too deeply and two quickly, especially in light of the recession. (Hartford Courant, 3/27/92)

Lieberman proposed greatly expanding the National Guard’s role in protecting the country. Speaking of the various agencies established to protect the country, Lieberman said he found that “while we don’t need to reinvent all these wheels, to some extent we need to redirect and re-engineer them.” And, Lieberman said, “for homeland security to be all it can be, the National Guard has to be all it can be.” Lieberman’s blueprint kept the 500,000 member Guard as part of the Pentagon, and gave it two major domestic missions. First, he said, it would take “a lead role in prevention and protection. They’re playing an important part now, but we can use their skills more wisely and more widely.” The Air National Guard, for instance, could “patrol the skies above our cities more comprehensively, especially when threat levels are high.” The Army National Guard could work with local officials to protect bridges, railways and roads. Second, Lieberman saw the Guard aiding in the event of terrorist attacks, helping to oversee training of “first responders” such as police and fire officials. (Hartford Courant, 6/27/02)

Lieberman criticized President Bush for his treatment of the military. Lieberman said Bush promised during the 2000 campaign that “help was on the way” for the military, and instead cut combat pay, compromised health care and threatened to eliminate public schools for domestic military families. In addition, he said Bush fought efforts to give veterans adequate health care and protect their retirement pay when they are disabled. Lieberman outlined a 12-part proposal. He offered “a decent wage” along with special compensation for housing, health care and other services so veterans can provide for their families, and he promised not to cut military pay if he were president. Lieberman said he would ensure reservists, National Guard and their families receive adequate care, and upgrade VA hospitals to help veterans. He said Bush proposed cutting school funding by 30 percent for children of parents serving on active duty, and tried to close or transfer control of 58 schools the government operates on 14 military bases in the country. Lieberman said he would provide quality education for military children at home and overseas by protecting funding and keeping military schools open. (Associated Press, 11/9/03)

Lieberman opposed Pentagon plans to move the Air National Guard’s 103rd Fighter Wing from Connecticut to Massachusetts. “The 103rd Air Fighter wing here at Bradley is a vital part of our national security. We’re not going to accept anything but total victory here,” Lieberman said. Lieberman said the state could not afford to lose the 1,200 jobs, including 300 full-time positions at the base, and $60 million in revenue the unit brought to Connecticut. “Any thought of relocating the 103rd Air Fighter Wing just doesn’t make sense,” Lieberman said. (Associated Press, 3/5/04)

Lieberman cosponsored an amendment to the defense authorization bill that improved military death benefits. “America’s military men and women sacrifice every day to keep us safe and secure and sometimes make the ultimate sacrifice. We owe it to those who have fallen in battle to provide for their families with benefits they can depend on,” said Lieberman. (Connecticut Post, 6/20/04)

Lieberman said deployments in Iraq were taking too much out of members of the military and their families. “The current pace of troop deployments to Iraq requires too much of the men and women of our Army,” Lieberman said. “Too many of them have been sent there too often and stayed too long and that has an undesirable effect on their families, their communities and the capacity of the Army to meet recruitment goals.” (Hartford Courant, 7/14/05)

Lieberman questioned the use of 6,000 National Guard troops to help border patrols. While Lieberman said using such troops “could be workable as a temporary solution,” he wanted to be sure the new mission “does not degrade our ability to fight the war on terror, dilute the Guard's ability to perform other essential missions, or divert resources from staffing, training and deploying additional Border Patrol agents.” (Hartford Courant, 5/16/06)

Lieberman and Barbara Boxer introduced an amendment to the Defense Authorization Bill mandating better mental health screening for troops being deployed and ensuring mental health services are provided immediately to anyone in a combat zone seeking that assistance. “War is hell,” Lieberman said, “and it can have a very bad effect on those who are fighting it.” (Norwich Bulletin, 6/16/06)



ENVIRONMENT

On the environment, Lieberman’s strong record is significantly blemished by his vote for President Bush’s energy bill in July 2005. The bill provided $14.6 billion in energy industry tax breaks, including $2.6 billion in tax breaks for oil and gas production and refining. Connecticut PIRG claimed that Lieberman had given in to pressures from the fossil fuel industry and the national Sierra Club said the bill opened up coastlines and wildlands to destructive oil and gas activities. While pro-environment groups have shown their displeasure, it is of note that the state’s electric companies have come to Lieberman’s defense.

KEY ISSUE

• Lieberman voted for President Bush’s energy bill in July 2005. The energy plan, which has been criticized for billions of dollars in corporate tax breaks to the oil, coal and nuclear industries, was opposed by Northeast Senators Dodd, Kerry, Kennedy, Clinton and Schumer. “In the end, [it was] a harder decision about whether to vote for it than it should have been,” Lieberman said. “I ended up deciding to vote for it because I decided it was, bottom line, that it was better than the status quo, that it does have some good tax incentives in it for fuel conservation for alternative energy, for fuel cells, which are critical to Eastern Connecticut. It has a policy appeal to the people at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to do something about this lightcap program which could raise electric rates a lot over the next period of years.” (Norwich Bulletin, 8/2/05)

The bill exempts oil and gas industries from some clean-water laws, streamlines permits for oil wells and power lines on public lands, and helps the hydropower industry appeal environmental restrictions. One obscure provision would repeal a Depression-era law that has prevented consolidation of public utilities, potentially transforming the nation’s electricity markets. It also includes $14.6 billion worth of subsidies and tax breaks over 10 years for most forms of energy, including $2.6 billion in tax breaks for oil and gas production and refining. The bill included $2 billion for “risk insurance” in case new nuclear plants run into construction and licensing delays. And nuclear utilities will be eligible for taxpayer-backed loan guarantees of as much as 80 percent the cost of their plants. (Washington Post, 7/30/05; 8/9/05; CQ Weekly, 7/29/05)

• Lieberman was criticized by Connecticut PIRG for his vote on the energy bill. In a letter to the editor, Connecticut Public Interest Research Group campaign director Hugh Williams wrote the following:

The energy bill passed by Congress funnels billions of dollars in subsidies to the oil, coal and nuclear industries while doing nothing to encourage the creation of a clean energy future. Unfortunately, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman apparently gave in to pressure from fossil fuel lobbyists and voted for the bill, even though it didn’t contain one of the few clean energy provisions in the original Senate bill – a renewable energy standard that would ensure that America gets at least 10 percent of its electricity from clean energy sources such as wind and solar power. . . . This energy bill is nothing but a collection of expensive giveaways to the oil, coal and nuclear lobbies. (Hartford Courant, 8/4/05)

• Lieberman has received nearly half a million dollars from the industries that benefited from the energy bill’s tax breaks. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Lieberman has received more than $470,000 from individuals and special interest PACs in the Energy and Natural Resources sector. Many of these contributions have come from the country’s largest energy producers and power plant operators, including Cinergy, Edison International, Entergy, Exelon and PSEG. (Center for Responsive Politics)

o The electric utilities came to Lieberman’s defense after he lost the Democratic Primary. Local electric utility officials said at a news conference defending Lieberman’s vote that the legislation would save Connecticut rate-payers one billion dollars over the next three years because it delayed a rate plan proposed by the operator’s of the region’s electrical grid. (Associated Press, 8/17/06)

• Sierra Club Executive Director Carl Pope lambasted the bill in a press release:

America needs a safer, cleaner and more secure energy future. Sadly, the energy bill that has emerged from the House and Senate conference committee fails on all counts. Instead of cutting America’s oil dependence, boosting production of renewable energy and lowering energy prices, this bill funnels billions of taxpayer dollars to polluting energy industries, and opens up our coastlines and wildlands to destructive oil and gas activities. (Sierra Club Press Release, 7/27/05)


FREE TRADE

Lieberman has consistently supported free trade agreements that hurt American workers and U.S. economic interests. A strong backer of free trade policies, Lieberman’s votes led to lower wages for Connecticut workers. In addition, his vote for NAFTA cost Connecticut over 12,000 jobs and his endorsement of expanded U.S.-China relations contributed to the loss of 5,300 jobs in the state and 2.6 million manufacturing jobs nationwide. Lieberman also voted to give President Bush fast-track authority, allowing the White House to negotiate potentially harmful agreements without congressional oversight. Furthermore, he opposed attaching stricter labor, environmental and human rights standards to a variety of free trade accords. Finally, despite high pro-labor ratings throughout this career, Lieberman faced widespread criticism from labor leaders for favoring free trade policies detrimental to union interests.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman has been a strong supporter of President Bush’s free trade policies. Despite Lieberman’s claims to the contrary, many free trade accords have endangered and ultimately cost Connecticut families thousands of jobs. He consistently supported trade agreements negotiated by the Bush administration, including CAFTA. In addition, the AFL-CIO found that NAFTA—another Lieberman favorite—cost Connecticut more than 12,000 jobs. (NAFTA: Senate Vote 395, 11/20/93; Andean Free Trade: HR 3009, Senate Vote 130, 5/23/02; CAFTA: HR 3045, Senate Vote 209, 7/28/05; Africa Free Trade Agreement: HR 434, Senate Vote 353, 11/3/99; U.S.-Australia FTA: HR 4759, Senate Vote 156, 7/15/04; U.S.-Morocco FTA: S 2677, Senate Vote 159, 7/21/04; Connecticut AFL-CIO)

• Lieberman’s support of free trade has led to lower wages for Connecticut workers. Average wages in the state’s industries that have added jobs since March 2001 are 32.3 percent lower than those in the industries that are shedding jobs. (Connecticut AFL-CIO, 7/7/04)

• Lieberman flip-flopped on U.S. policy toward China. Lieberman supported renewing China’s trade status and backed strong diplomatic relations with the Chinese government. In fact, he stated that increased trade with the Asian giant would “strengthen our economy and create jobs.” However, these policies contributed to the loss of 5,300 jobs in Connecticut between 2001 and 2003. Despite this general support of normalized relations, Lieberman frequently decried the China’s unfair economic practices and agreed that Chinese policies contributed to the loss of 2.6 million manufacturing jobs in the United States. (Bell & Howell Information and Learning Business Dateline, 6/5/00; Associated Press, 7/18/03; Associated Press, 8/9/00; Economic Policy Institute, “Effects on Employment of U.S. Trade Deficit with China, by State and Major Industry” Norwich Bulletin, 1/23/04; Connecticut Post, 9/7/03)

• Lieberman supported presidential fast-track authority. Lieberman voted to give President Bush greater trade negotiation power by supporting measures to renew presidential fast-track authority. This mandate allowed the president to approve and implement trade agreements without congressional approval and without provisions that potentially harm U.S. economic interests, cause American job losses and endanger the environment. (HR 3009, Senate Vote 198, 7/30/02; Senate Vote 203, 8/1/02; Senate Vote 207, 8/1/02)

• Lieberman opposed stricter labor, environmental and human rights standards. Lieberman opposed attaching more stringent labor, environmental and human rights standards to free trade agreements with developing nations. (HR 434, Senate Vote 345, 11/2/99; HR 434, Senate Vote 347, 11/2/99; HR 3009, Senate Vote 113, 5/15/02; HR 434, Senate Vote 352, 11/3/99)

• Lieberman touted his pro-labor credentials while opposing unions’ interests. Lieberman’s complicated view on labor was labeled his ‘labor pain,’ due to two the two contradictory images he displayed to union voters. During his 2004 presidential bid, he voiced strong support for labor while individual unions questioned his consistent backing for free trade agreements. Despite his lifetime rating of 84 percent from the AFL-CIO, one union leader said, “Those voting percentages are not really an accurate reflection of the labor record.” Referring to Lieberman’s trade stances, he added, “Some votes are more important than others.” (Hartford Courant, 8/8/03; Associated Press, 9/16/03)

FREE TRADE KEY VOTES

Lieberman Voted for NAFTA

Senate Vote 395 R 34-10; D 27-28 11/20/93

Lieberman voted for passage of the bill that approved the North American Free Trade Agreement and made the necessary changes to U.S. statutory law in order to implement and comply with the trade pact. The Senate passed the bill 61-38.

Lieberman Voted for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

Senate Vote 329 R 35-11; D 41-13 12/1/94

Lieberman voted for passage of the bill that made statutory changes to implement the new world trade agreement negotiated under the Uruguay Round of GATT. The agreement reduced tariffs and trade barriers, ensured stricter enforcement of world trade rules through the newly established World Trade Organization (WTO), and expanded GATT provision to cover such sectors as agriculture, services and intellectual property. The legislation also accelerated tax payment schedules, changed eligibility standards for certain federal programs and made other changes to offset lost revenues from tariff reductions and comply with pay-as-you-go budget stipulations. The Senate passed the bill 76-24.

Lieberman Opposed Attaching Stricter Labor Standards to Free Trade Agreements

HR 434 Senate Vote 345 R 46-6; D 8-37 11/2/99

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Hollings, D-S.C., amendment that required the president to negotiate a side agreement with each nation on labor standards and submit the agreement to Congress before that country could receive the bill’s trade benefits. The Senate agreed to the motion 54-43.

Lieberman Opposed Attaching Stricter Environmental Standards to Free Trade Agreements

HR 434 Senate Vote 347 R 48-4; D 9-36 11/2/99

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Hollings, D-S.C., amendment that required the president to negotiate a side agreement on the environment with each nation before that country could receive the bill’s trade benefits. The Senate agreed to the motion 57-40.

Lieberman Voted Against Reciprocal Trade Agreements

HR 434 Senate Vote 348 R 45-7; D 25-20 11/2/99

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Hollings, D-S.C., amendment that required the president to negotiate and implement a reciprocal trade agreement with any nation benefiting from this bill’s benefits. The Senate agreed to the motion 70-27.

Lieberman Opposed Attaching Stricter Human Rights Standards to Free Trade Agreements

HR 434 Senate Vote 349 R 48-5; D 18-26 11/3/99

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Wellstone, D.-MN, amendment that required Caribbean nations receiving the bill’s trade benefits to avoid significant human rights violations and provide effective enforcement of internationally recognized worker rights. The Senate agreed to the motion 66-31.

Lieberman Opposed Stricter Standards for Sub-Saharan Africa Trade Partners

HR 434 Senate Vote 352 R 48-5; D 18-24 11/3/99

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Feingold, D-WI, amendment that revised the bill’s African trade provisions by strengthening the standards a sub-Saharan African nation must achieve in order to receive trade benefits. The measure also increased prohibitions on transshipment of products and expanded the list of products eligible for preferential tariff treatment. The Senate agreed to the motion 66-29.

Lieberman Voted for the Africa Free Trade Agreement

HR 434 Senate Vote 353 R 46-6; D 30-13 11/3/99

Lieberman supported passage of the Africa Free Trade Agreement, which extended certain trade preferences to the nations of sub-Saharan Africa and sought to promote private investment in the region. It also expanded U.S. trade with the Caribbean, increased the Generalized System of Preferences through June 30, 2004, and reauthorized the Trade Adjustment Assistance Act through September 30, 2001. The Senate passed the bill 76-19.

Lieberman Supported President Bush’s Position on the Africa Trade Agreement

HR 434 Senate Vote 98 R 47-6; D 30-13 5/11/00

Lieberman voted for the conference report on the Africa Trade Agreement, which extended certain tariff benefits to the nations of the Caribbean Central America and sub-Saharan Africa. The Senate passed the bill 77-19.

Lieberman Voted Against Stronger Enforcement of Labor and Environmental Provisions in Free Trade Agreements

HR 3009 Senate Vote 113 R 48-0; D 20-30 5/15/02

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Durbin, D-IL, amendment, which provided for a substitute of the trade negotiating authority in the underlying Baucus, D-MT, substitute amendment. The Durbin measure also required that preserving trade laws be the principal objective of U.S. negotiations. In addition, it provided equal status to the enforcement of labor and environmental provisions compared to all other components in the Andean Free Trade Agreement. Finally, the legislation demanded a biennial review of negotiations and allowed for an opportunity for a disapproval resolution once each Congress. The Senate agreed to the motion 69-30.

Lieberman Opposed Expanding the Size of a Congressional Group to Oversee Trade Provisions

HR 3009 Senate Vote 125 R 48-0; D 17-32 5/23/02

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Byrd, D-WV, amendment, which altered the composition of the proposed congressional oversight group for the Andean Free Trade Agreement to include 11 members from each chamber who did not serve on the Senate Finance Committee or the House Ways and Means Committee. It also required the group to share access to briefings and consultations with relevant committees. Senate agreed to the motion 66-32.

Lieberman Opposed Regulations for Disapproval Resolutions

HR 3009 Senate Vote 126 R 48-0; D 17-32 5/23/02

Lieberman voted for the motion to table the Byrd, D-WV, amendment, which provided that a disapproval resolution regarding the Andean Free Trade Agreement be referred to the Rules and Administration Committee and the Finance Committee. It also established the automatic discharge of a disapproval resolution if either committee failed to report the bill within ten days. Finally, the measure reduced the debate time on a disapproval regulation in the Senate from 20 hours to six hours. The Senate agreed to the motion 66-32.

Lieberman Voted for the Andean Free Trade Agreement

HR 3009 Senate Vote 130 R 41-5; D 24-25 5/23/02

Lieberman voted for passage of the Andean Free Trade Agreement, which extended duty-free status to certain products from Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, renewed the president’s fast-track authority and reauthorized and expanded a program to provide retraining and relocation assistance to U.S. workers hurt by trade agreements. The bill also created a refundable 70 percent tax credit for health insurance costs for displaced workers and authorized a five-year extension of the Generalized System of Preferences. The Senate passed the bill 66-30.

Lieberman Supported Fast-Track Authority

HR 3009 Senate Vote 198 R 40-8; D 25-25 7/30/02

Lieberman voted for the Daschle, D-S.D., motion to proceed to the conference report on the bill that renewed the president’s fast-track authority and extended duty-free status to certain products from Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. The Senate agreed to the motion 66-33.

Lieberman Voted to Limit Debate on Presidential Fast-Track Authority and the Andean Free Trade Agreement

HR 3009 Senate Vote 203 R 43-5; D 21-27 8/1/02

Lieberman voted for the cloture motion on the conference report for the bill that renewed the president’s fast-track authority and extended duty-free status to certain products from Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. It also reauthorized and expanded a program to provide retraining assistance to U.S. workers hurt by trade agreements, created a 65 percent tax credit for health insurance costs of displaced workers and authorized a five-year extension of the Generalized System of Preferences. The Senate agreed to the motion 64-32.

Lieberman Supported Presidential Fast-Track Authority and the Andean Free Trade Agreement

HR 3009 Senate Vote 207 R 43-5; D 20-29 8/1/02

Lieberman voted for adoption of the conference report on the bill that allowed special trade promotion authority for congressional consideration of trade agreements reached prior to June 1, 2005. It also renewed the president’s fast-track authority and extended duty-free status to Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. In addition, the measure reauthorized and expanded a program to provide retraining assistance to U.S. workers hurt by trade agreements, created a 65 percent tax credit for health insurance costs of displaced workers and authorized a five-year extension of the Generalized System of Preferences. The Senate adopted the report 64-34.

Lieberman Voted for the U.S.-Australia Free Trade Agreement

HR 4759 Senate Vote 156 R 48-2; D 31-14 7/15/04

Lieberman voted for passage of the U.S.-Australia Free Trade Agreement, which reduced tariffs and trade barriers between the two countries. It gave all U.S. agricultural exports to Australia immediate duty-free access, phased out U.S. duties on Australian beef and lamb exports and slightly increased the current U.S. quota for Australian dairy products. The Senate passed the bill 80-16.

Lieberman Voted for the U.S.-Morocco Free Trade Agreement

S 2677 Senate Vote 159 R 46-5; D 38-8 7/21/04

Lieberman voted for passage of the U.S.-Morocco free trade agreement, which reduced tariffs and trade barriers between the two countries. It made more than 95 percent of bilateral trade in consumer and industrial products duty free immediately, while eliminating all remaining tariffs within nine years. The measure also provided for new tariff-rate quotas for U.S. farmers and ranchers of poultry and beef and decreased levies on agricultural products, such as sorghum, corn, soybeans and corn. The Senate passed the bill 85-13.

Lieberman Supported CAFTA

HR 5045 Senate Vote 209 R 43-12; D 11-33 7/28/05

Lieberman supported passage of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), which established free trade pacts between the U.S. and Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and a separate accord with the Dominican Republic. It also eliminated customs duties on all goods originating in and traded among the participating nations within ten days. The Senate passed the bill 55-45.

Lieberman Supported Free Trade Over National Security and Domestic Companies

HR 2862 Senate Vote 232 R 8-47; D 31-12 9/15/05

Lieberman voted against the Dorgan, D-N.D., amendment to the Commerce-Justice-Science Appropriations Bill, which prohibited the U.S. trade representative from using funds appropriated in the bill to establish any trade agreement that altered U.S. law relating to national security import restrictions or remedies to domestic firms harmed by the trade practices of foreign competitors. The Senate rejected the amendment 39-60.

FREE TRADE CLIP SUMMARIES

A Norwich Bulletin editorial called Lieberman “anti-American”:

“Since 1990, pro-free trade, anti-American U.S. Sen. Joseph Lieberman, D-Conn., has voted against American workers by voting for huge increases of low-skilled foreign workers, continuing chain migration, allowing firms to lay off Americans to make room for foreign workers, nearly doubling foreign high-tech worker visas, rewarding illegal aliens with in-state tuition, amnesty and legal status by paying a fine, and removing security steps performed on potential immigrants in their home countries.” (Norwich Bulletin, 7/15/06)

The AFL-CIO endorsed Lieberman during the 2006 primary despite criticism from some union members. Supporters argued that Lieberman should receive their backing for his lifetime 84 percent voting record in favor of AFL-CIO issues, while detractors said his repeated votes in favor of free-trade agreements hurt unions. “I can go back to 1993 and say Joe Lieberman was not there on trade,” stated William Rudis of Local 1746 of the International Association of Machinists. “We don’t need to be in Boston to spill the tea” to start a revolution, he said. The group did agree that if Lieberman lost the primary, they would reconsider their endorsement. “In my mind, if Joe Lieberman loses the primary and runs as an independent, then he’s left the party he’s been a lifelong member of,” said teachers union president Sharon Palmer. “How long before he would throw labor aside, as well?” (Hartford Courant, 6/28/06)

Lieberman stood by his pro-NAFTA vote during his 2004 presidential bid. Despite criticism from his primary opponents, he declared, “It (his vote) was not a mistake.” (Hartford Courant, 1/30/04)

Lieberman decried China’s unfair economic practices. He said, “America’s manufacturing crisis - and (President Bush’s) economic leadership - is hitting closer to home every day. I have called for a crackdown on unfair currency manipulation by China and other trade partners that has cost American manufacturing jobs such as those at Rogers Corporation, but the Administration has yet to heed this call.” (Norwich Bulletin, 1/23/04)

Lieberman gave an unclear answer when asked if he would sign legislation expanding free trade into Latin America if he were president. In his five-minute response, he expressed his concern about unfair trade but reminded the interviewer that protectionist walls cut off American markets. “He didn’t answer the question,” the reporter said later. (Hartford Courant, 1/18/04)

Lieberman was pleased that the 20-month-old tariffs on steel would be lifted but blasted Bush for imposing the tariffs in the first place. “Bush could have dealt with the steel crisis,” Lieberman claimed, “by helping workers and companies address the costs of retirement and health care, convincing international competitors to adopt fair trade practices, or worked with the industry on the manufacturing process. Instead, he tried a single, grandstand play, imposing unilateral tariffs.” (Connecticut Post, 12/7/03)

Lieberman touted himself as pro-worker amid criticism from the AFL-CIO for his free trade positions. “I’ve fought throughout my career for working people, I believe in the labor union movement, I’ve supported labor law reform...but I’m not going to deceive anybody into thinking I’m against trade. One-fifth of jobs in America today – that’s millions of jobs - are dependent on trade. You’re not going to help the American economy by putting a wall around America,” Lieberman stated. He added, “I’ve had the guts to stand up before audiences and not tell them all they want to hear.” (Associated Press, 9/16/03)

Lieberman agreed that the yuan had contributed to the loss of 2.6 million manufacturing jobs in the United States in fewer than two years. “We are bleeding manufacturing jobs in America today, and everyone knows China’s manipulation of its currency is a big reason why,” said Lieberman. He explained that by undervaluing its currency, Chinese manufactured goods could be exported at artificially low prices, making it difficult for U.S. manufacturers to compete. (Connecticut Post, 9/7/03)

Lieberman supported trade regulations, though he maintained his general backing of free trade agreements. He said President Bush should “spend more effort enforcing trade agreements, protecting intellectual property, demanding a stop to currency manipulation by China, and encouraging investment in domestic manufacturing.” He stated that the U.S. had lost 2.4 million manufacturing jobs since Bush took office and proposed that to remedy this problem he would give tax credits to companies which keep manufacturing in the U.S., saying, “We’re not going to have a strong economy unless we’re making things here.” He added he wanted to eliminate the so-called ‘Bermuda loophole’ that allowed companies to register overseas to avoid some U.S. taxes. (Associated Press, 8/12/03)

Lieberman’s complicated view on labor was labeled his ‘labor pain’ in regards to the two distinct, even contradictory, images he has displayed to the ‘labor vote.’ Lieberman stuck with the laborers during his various stops along his presidential campaign trail, yet, at the same time, was viewed skeptically for his endorsement of free trade agreements. Although the AFL-CIO had given Lieberman consistently high marks as a Senator, individual unions questioned him, saying, “Those voting percentages are not really an accurate reflection of the labor record. Some votes are more important than others.” (Hartford Courant, 8/8/03)

Lieberman said that although he backed strong diplomatic relations with China, he believed the country violated free-trade rules. Lieberman criticized Bush’s free-trade policies with China while also faulting one of his Democratic rivals for protectionism that built “walls around our economy.” “Rather than leaving America’s workers to sink or swim, as this president is doing, I want our government to help business create a rising tide of manufacturing growth - and help our workers ride that tide to new jobs and prosperity,” Lieberman said. (Associated Press, 7/18/03)

Lieberman said such “blatant protectionism threatens the confidence necessary for free trade to flourish, and it invites similar tactics” in regards to a European snub of Pratt & Whitney’s bid to build engines for a new Airbus military transport. (Associated Press, 5/7/03)

Lieberman supported renewing China’s trade status. He said, “It will lower trade barriers with China, which will extend American exports, strengthen our economy and create jobs.” Lieberman added that “it is the right thing to do” and asserted that the United States would be better off by engaging China in world affairs rather than isolating the Asian giant. (Bell & Howell Information and Learning Business Dateline, 6/5/00)


HADASSAH LIEBERMAN

Lieberman’s wife, Hadassah, was employed by Hill and Knowlton, a Washington, DC lobbying firm while the company was registered to lobby the U.S. Senate. While employing Hadassah Lieberman, the lobbying firm’s client list included many major companies such as MCI, Fidelity Investments, Hewlett Packard and Boeing. The firm was also registered to lobby for Tyco International, which has been criticized in the press for its corporate expatriate tax status.

It is of note that Hadassah Lieberman previously worked for Pfizer and still benefits from a large amount of stockholdings in the company.

KEY ISSUES

• Hadassah Lieberman was employed by Hill and Knowlton while the company was registered to lobby the Senate. Although Lieberman herself was not registered as a lobbyist of the Senate, the company was registered to lobby on behalf of major companies such as Tyco International, Fidelity Investments, Guilford Pharmaceuticals, MCI, Bausch & Lomb, Hewlett Packard and Boeing. (Senate Office of Public Records)

• Hadassah Lieberman owns significant stock in drug company Pfizer. Joe Lieberman’s most current financial disclosure indicated that his wife owned between $15,001 and $50,000 in Pfizer stock. During Lieberman’s 2000 presidential campaign, the Lieberman’s revealed that the stock holdings in Pfizer were equivalent to 1,000 shares. (Secretary of the Senate)

• Hadassah Lieberman previously worked for Pfizer. According to a statement released by Hill and Knowlton upon her joining the firm, Lieberman had extensive experience in the health care field, including a stint at pharmaceutical giant Pfizer. (Washington Post, 3/17/05)

Press Coverage of Hadassah Lieberman’s Lobbying Efforts

Hadassah Lieberman did not do any lobbying for APCO Associates during her tenure there. “She was straightforward, honest and very strategic in her thinking,” said B.J. Cooper of APCO Worldwide. “She did not do any lobbying. That was not her role here,” he said. (New York Post, 8/8/00)

During the 2000 presidential campaign Hadassah owned 1,000 shares of Pfizer, Inc. stock, valued at $15,000 to $50,000. According to Lieberman’s spokesman, the stockers were “hers alone.” (American Health Line, 9/27/00)

Hadassah Lieberman earned more than $300,000 delivering speeches in 2001. Hadassah emerged from the 2000 election as a popular speaker on the Jewish lecture circuit, pulling in about 328,000 in 2001, according to her husband's annual financial disclosure forms. Some observers questioned the appropriateness of a senator's spouse speaking for money, especially one whose fame stemmed primarily from the political fortunes of her husband. “Unless it can really be shown that there is a reason that an individual is being paid for her expertise, then it does look like she is getting paid as a substitute for his speaking,” said Larry Nobel, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics. “In perspective, I think it falls in a category of ongoing issues that arise having to do with the proper role of spouses and whether someone is trading off of a spouse's influence. It's not the most critical thing in the world, but it is a constant problem that comes up.” (Jewish Forward, 5/24/02)

Hadassah Lieberman joined Washington public relations firm Hill and Knowlton as a senior counselor in the health and pharmaceutical practice in March, 2005. Lieberman hoped “to draw on her political experience in concentrating on health care policy and public health initiatives.” (Roll Call, 3/16/05)

According to a statement released by Hill and Knowlton, Hadassah Lieberman had extensive experience in the health care field including stints at Hospital of St. Raphael in New Haven, Pfizer Inc. and Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. (Washington Post, 3/17/05)

As of July 23, 2006, Hadassah Lieberman was no longer working at Hill and Knowlton. (Hartford Courant, 7/23/06)

Hill and Knowlton Senate Lobbying Clients in 2005-2006

Fidelity Investments Inc
Port Of Tampa Maritime Industries Assn
Biotechnology Industry Organization
Nielsen Media Research Inc
Fulbright & Jaworski Llp
Nasscom - National Association of Software and Services Companies
Dallas Independent School District
Denic Eg
Benjamin Moore & Co
Hewlett Packard
Guilford Pharmaceuticals
Boeing
Future of Russia Foundation
Steptoe & Johnson
Ogilvy & Mather
Tyco Intl Us Inc
Triple Canopy
Healthtech
Mci
Dubai International Capital Llc
Bausch & Lomb

FLIP-FLOPS, HYPOCRISY AND BROKEN PROMISES

Although many point to Lieberman’s support of the Bush Administration’s policy on Iraq while simultaneously calling for accountability of the Administration as the longtime Senator’s key point of hypocrisy, Lieberman’s record is filled with significant flip-flops and broken promises on important issues.

Lieberman has a long history of flip-flopping on important policy issues. In his 1988 Senate campaign, he criticized incumbent Republican Senator Lowell Weicker for supporting the gasoline tax; yet Lieberman voted to raise that very levy in 1993. Lieberman also attacked his 1988 opponent for inconsistent votes on Social Security and vowed that he would never vote to cut benefits. However, Lieberman co-sponsored and voted for legislation that could decrease average Social Security payments by $1,200 over seven years. Furthermore, in 1998, Lieberman claimed that Social Security privatization “has to happen” before switching his position and opposing personal retirement accounts upon joining the 2000 Democratic presidential ticket. On affirmative action, after stating in 1995 that “Many affirmative action programs must change because they are inconsistent with the law and basic American values of equal treatment and opportunity,” Lieberman was forced to clarify his position to African-American community leaders at the 2000 Democratic convention, declaring, “I have supported affirmative action. I do support affirmative action, and I will support affirmative action.”

Regarding broken promises, Lieberman has proven himself a hypocrite on a number of matters. In his 1988 Senate campaign, he assailed his opponent’s missed Senate votes, poor attendance record and use of a friend’s private jet. Lieberman, however, missed 63 votes in 2000 and 250 votes in 2003, giving him attendance rates of just 79 percent and 46 percent for those years. He has also taken numerous trips on corporate planes, including one owned by Pfizer that brought him to a large drug company gathering in West Virginia. It is of note that Business Week reported Lieberman’s spending on reimbursements for travel on corporate jets as the sixth most in Congress from 2001 to 2005.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman flip-flopped on increasing the gas tax. In the 1988 Senate campaign, Lieberman criticized incumbent Republican Sen. Lowell P. Weicker, Jr., for supporting the gasoline tax. On June 25, 1993, however, Lieberman voted for a deficit reduction plan that raised the gasoline tax 4.3 cents a gallon. (Hartford Courant, 8/3/93)

• Lieberman broke his promise to never vote to cut Social Security benefits. In 1988, Lieberman attacked his opponent, Senator Lowell Weicker, for his inconsistent votes on Social Security. Speaking at the New Britain Senior Center, Lieberman accused Weicker of cutting cost-of-living increases for Social Security recipients while voting to give himself and other U.S. Senators a cost-of-living increase as part of their salaries. Lieberman also promised never to vote to cut benefits. (Hartford Courant, 6/2/88)

o In 1996, however, Lieberman cosponsored and voted for legislation that adjusted the Consumer Price Index, which would slow cost-of-living increases for Social Security recipients. The provision was expected to save $126 billion over seven years. (S Con Res 57, Senate Vote 150, 5/23/96) Sen Jim Exon, D-NE, said the change would cut $1,200 in Social Security payments to the average recipient over seven years. (States News Service, 5/23/96)

• Lieberman has been inconsistent in his position on privatizing Social Security.

o In 1998, Lieberman said privatization of Social Security “has to happen.” In an interview with the San Diego News-Tribune editorial board, Lieberman expressed his support for privatization. “A remarkable wave of innovative thinking is advancing the concept of privatization, some personalization of retirement plans,” he said. “There is some risk obviously, but each of us has made a judgment about this in our own lives. . . . Not everybody supports this. We’re going to see again a kind of old Democratic Party/new Democratic Party kind of split on this. I think in the end that individual control of part of the retirement/Social Security funds has to happen.” (Copley News Service, 5/4/98)

o Lieberman flip-flopped on Social Security privatization when he was selected as Al Gore’s running mate. Lieberman was criticized in a 2000 column by Libertarian columnist Jacob Sullum for his compromised position. “Joe Lieberman’s integrity did not last long. Barely a week after he was picked for the Democratic ticket, the Connecticut senator had renounced most of the positions that made him an interesting choice,” Sullum wrote. (Washington Times, 8/24/00)

• Lieberman both opposed and supported affirmative action.

o In a floor speech, Lieberman commended President Clinton’s efforts to examine the federal government’s adherence to affirmative action standards. However, he said, “some poorly conceived and implemented affirmative action programs have done more to disturb and confuse [the]...national consensus about equal opportunities than they have done to help their intended beneficiaries.” He continued, “Affirmative action is dividing us in ways its creators could never have intended because most Americans who do support equal opportunity, and are not biased, do not think it is fair to discriminate against some Americans as a way to make up for historic discrimination against other Americans.” (Lieberman floor speech, 104th Congress, First Session, 141 Congressional record S 10315)

o Lieberman flip-flopped on affirmative action. In 1995, he told a group of reporters, “You can’t defend policies that are based on group preferences”—a clear reference to affirmative action statutes. He added, “When we have such policies, we have the effect of breaking some of those ties in civil society that have held us together because [the affirmative action policies] are patently unfair.” Eight years later, in advance of his 2004 presidential bid, he claimed that he supported the controversial University of Michigan admissions standards, which awarded extra points to certain minority students as part of their overall rating system for applicants. In fact, he said, such a system is “a response to the unfortunate reality that a lot of minority students go to schools that are under-performing, and to give them the opportunity to come up and make it into America’s middle class they need that plus factor.” (Hartford Courant, 1/20/03; Meet the Press, 1/19/03)

o Lieberman was forced to clarify his position on affirmative action when he joined the presidential ticket in 2000. Leaders in the African-American community were outraged by Lieberman’s 1995 statement which said, “Many affirmative action programs must change because they are inconsistent with the law and basic American values of equal treatment and opportunity.” Five years later, in order to defuse any controversy for the Gore-Lieberman ticket, Lieberman appeared at a meeting of black delegates at the beginning of the 2000 Democratic National Convention and declared, “I have supported affirmative action. I do support affirmative action, and I will support affirmative action because history and current reality make it necessary.” (Hartford Courant, 1/20/03)

• Lieberman has been a hypocrite on his voting record, missing key votes that had driven his criticism of Lowell Weicker. Lieberman said his opponent had poor attendance in the U.S. Senate, hurting middle class families and the environment as a result. “He has one of the worst attendance records in the United States Senate,” said Lieberman. “He’s missed votes that could have really helped middle-class taxpayers, could have helped clean up our environment, could have protected jobs.” (New York Times, 10/13/88)

o However, Lieberman has missed more than 400 roll call votes on the floor of the U.S. Senate. (Congressional Record)

o Lieberman missed 250 votes in 2003, giving him an attendance record of just 46 percent. While campaigning with Al Gore in 2000, Lieberman missed 63 votes for an attendance record of just 79 percent. (Congressional Quarterly Member Profile)

o Lieberman missed votes on the Medicare prescription drug benefit, controversial nominations by President George W. Bush, fuel economy standards, defense and homeland security appropriations and budget votes. (Congressional Record)

• Lieberman criticized Lowell Weicker for using a friend’s private jet, but Lieberman has taken numerous trips himself on corporate jets.

o Lieberman assailed Senator Lowell Weicker for unethical behavior. Lieberman’s campaign and state Democratic Party leaders described Weicker’s use of a friend’s private jet as a conflict of interest. (Hartford Courant, 10/20/88)

o In May 2006, Business Week reported that Lieberman’s spending on reimbursements for travel on corporate jets was the sixth most in Congress from 2001 to 20005. (Business Week, 5/22/06)

o A February 2006 profile revealed that Lieberman had taken seven flights on corporate jets in 2005. According to information provided by Lieberman’s office, he had taken trips on the corporate jets and helicopters of Fisher Scientific International, Level 3 Communications, Sempra Energy and Limited Brands. (Associated Press, 2/16/06)

o A Time Magazine profile reported that Lieberman was flown on Pfizer’s corporate jet to a lavish resort in West Virginia, where he spoke at a large-drug company gathering in 1998. During his U.S. Senate career, Lieberman provided significant assistance to the pharmaceutical industry. He helped pass an amendment that prevented low-priced generic drugs from being made available to consumers earlier, voted to table an amendment that required manufacturers of medical devices like syringes to be fully accurate in labeling and voted to make it optional, rather than mandatory, for producers of medical devices like pacemakers and artificial heart valves to track the performance of their products after implantation. (Time Magazine, 8/21/00)

o Lieberman cosponsored an amendment to change the reimbursement rules for lawmakers when they use corporate aircraft, but the amendment was not included in the Senate’s ethics reforms passed in 2006. Despite the failure to include the corporate jet provisions in the bill, Lieberman said, “This is a real victory for those who believe the relationship between members of Congress and lobbyists has grown too close.” (The Weekly of Business Aviation, 3/13/06; San Francisco Chronicle, 3/30/06)



1988 CAMPAIGN

Lieberman’s first Senate campaign included a number of statements and characterizations that now apply to himself. Running against a three-term incumbent at the time, Lieberman stated that “18 years is enough for a senator” and said, “It’s time for a change. It’s time for somebody fresh.” Lieberman also believed it was remarkable that an 18-year incumbent could lose significant support among his constituents. Lieberman conducted a campaign that employed a “left-right strategy,” highlighting his attempts to straddle both ends of the political spectrum and confusing voters to the point where one said, “In a way, Lieberman is more of a Republican.” Finally, Lieberman’s opponent, Lowell Weicker, claimed: “He (Lieberman) put on a new suit for this election…You cannot change your image in a matter of months.”

Regarding specific issues from the 1988 campaign, Lieberman faced criticism for his actions as Attorney General. He avoided a multi-state lawsuit against a number of Connecticut-based insurance companies at the beginning of his Senate campaign, raising questions about whether he simply aimed to avoid political retribution from the state’s powerful insurance industry. It is also of note that he received $6,150 in campaign donations from Advest Inc. executives for the 1988 contest. In addition, Lieberman defended his support for a required moment of silence in state public schools, despite federal court rulings classifying such as measure as unconstitutional school prayer.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman believed “18 years is enough for a senator.” Lieberman stated that, after his opponent’s three terms in the U.S. Senate, Connecticut was ready for a new direction. He said, “It’s time for a change. It’s time for a somebody fresh.” Earlier in the campaign, he also asserted, “This is an incumbent a lot of people don’t like. There are a lot of people who feel that 18 years is enough for a senator.” Finally, upon declaring victory in November, Lieberman thanked Senator Weicker for serving 18 years, but, he added, “it’s time for someone new.” (New York Times, 9/17/88; 7/10/88; 11/9/88)

o Lieberman’s campaign claimed voters wanted a change after Weicker’s three terms in the Senate. “For a three-term incumbent…to be in trouble as deep as [Weicker] is…clearly shows the people of Connecticut believe it’s time for a change,” said a campaign spokesperson. In addition, Lieberman responded to a poll showing him trailing Weicker 42 percent to 36 percent, saying, “Remarkably, you have an 18-year incumbent who 60 percent of the people don’t support.” (Associated Press, 11/3/88; New York Times, 11/6/88)

• Lieberman played both sides of the political spectrum in order to win the election. Lieberman and his staffers made a point of using a “left-right strategy” in an attempt to solidify “Lieberman’s middle-of-the-road Democratic base, while picking off liberal Democrats and disaffected conservative Republicans.” This strategy appeared to confuse many voters about his true philosophy and whether he or Republican Senator Lowell Weicker was the real liberal in the race. One voter even said, “In a way, Lieberman is more of a Republican.” (Hartford Courant, 6/19/88; 11/3/88; 11/5/88)

o Lieberman was accused of altering his political image for the Senate campaign. Lieberman’s opponent, Senator Lowell Weicker, said, “He (Lieberman) put on a new suit for this election.” He added, “You cannot change your image in a matter of months.” (Hartford Courant, 10/28/88)

o Lieberman accused his opponent of not being a real member of either major party. “Lowell Weicker is not a real Republican,” Lieberman charged. “He’s not a real Democrat. He does what he wants when he wants to do it.” (Washington Post, 10/29/88)

• Lieberman faced conflict-of-interest charges as Connecticut Attorney General and a U.S. Senate candidate. Lieberman avoided a multi-state lawsuit against a number of Connecticut-based insurance companies, raising questions about whether he simply sought to avoid political retribution from the state’s power insurance industry. In addition, a prominent state political columnist called on Lieberman to resign from the Attorney General’s office while pursuing a Senate seat, saying, “I think it is unwise for the attorney general to hang on to his job and make advisory opinions that may…benefit…campaign contributors.” (Hartford Courant, 3/29/88; 2/21/88)

o Lieberman accepted donations from an insurance company he investigated. Lieberman received $6,150 in campaign contributions from Advest Inc. executives during the 1988 race. At the time, Lieberman was in the midst of formulating an advisory opinion regarding some of the company’s actions. (Hartford Courant, 2/88)

• Lieberman defended his support for school prayer. In a friend-of-the-court brief filed as Connecticut’s Attorney General, Lieberman supported a law mandating a daily moment of silence in public schools. However, the Supreme Court upheld lower federal court rulings, which held that such a law violated the First Amendment’s establishment clause. In addition, Lieberman’s opponent claimed that Lieberman voted in favor of school prayer while serving in the state Senate. Lieberman’s spokesperson responded, asserting a distinction between a “moment of silence” and “organized school prayer.” (Hartford Courant, 12/5/87; New York Times, 11/3/88)


1988 CAMPAIGN CLIP SUMMARIES

Lieberman announced his intention to raise money for a Senate candidacy in November 1987. He assailed Republican Senator Lowell Weicker for ignoring the “gut concerns” of state residents and stated his appreciation that state and national Democratic leaders stood firmly behind his campaign. (Hartford Courant, 11/26/87)

Lieberman supported a law mandating a daily moment of silence in public schools. He issued a “friend-of-the-court” brief in the Supreme Court’s consideration of a New Jersey moment of silence law, arguing that the statute did not violate the constitutional separation of church and state. A federal district court, federal appellate court and the U.S. Supreme Court disagreed, holding that the New Jersey measure constituted a violation of the First Amendment’s establishment clause. (Hartford Courant, 12/5/87)

Lieberman’s campaign strategists said Senator Lowell Weicker only represented an “image,” not substantive leadership. Lieberman’s pollster, Stanley Greenberg, stated, “Lowell Weicker’s position in Connecticut is largely image and has little support in either the electoral realities, or in the polling realities.” Greenberg and media consultant Carter Eskew also pointed out Weicker’s relative weakness as an incumbent, having won his previous re-election fight with only 50.5 percent of the vote. (Hartford Courant, 2/2/88)

Lieberman accepted campaign donations from an insurance company while issuing an advisory opinion regarding the group as Attorney General. Advest Inc. executives contributed $6,150 to Lieberman’s Senate bid approximately one month after Connecticut Insurance Commissioner Peter W. Gillies requested the opinion from Lieberman’s office. Lieberman denied wrongdoing, saying he would reject money from people under investigation by his office or involved in litigation with it, but not from those involved in advisory opinions. (Hartford Courant, 2/88)

Lieberman faced criticism in an op-ed piece that called on him to resign his Attorney General’s post while running for the Senate. Columnist Irving Kravsow wrote, “Although it isn’t illegal, I think it is unwise for the attorney general to hang on to his job and make advisory opinions that may directly or indirectly benefit some of his campaign contributors.” (Hartford Courant, 2/21/88)

Lieberman claimed Senator Lowell Weicker accomplished little that benefited Connecticut residents or advanced the American dream. He also asserted that, while Weicker portrayed himself as an activist politician, his record showed that he had not sponsored and helped pass laws that addressed state residents’ everyday concerns. “If you ask most people, ‘What has Lowell Weicker done for the state of Connecticut?’ most of them end up scratching their heads,” Lieberman said. “And if you ask them, ‘What has he done for you and your family?’ most of them end up scratching their heads.” (Hartford Courant, 2/28/88)

The Hartford Courant wondered why then-Connecticut Attorney General Lieberman avoided a multi-state lawsuit against a number of insurance companies. A group of states accused four big insurance organizations, mostly based in Hartford, of conspiring to restrict liability coverage and illegally manufacturing a mid-1980s insurance crisis for their financial benefit. The editorial noted Lieberman’s absence from the case with surprise, but also suggested that the insurance industry’s political power and Lieberman’s Senate bid might have played a significant role in his decision to avoid the suit. (Hartford Courant, 3/29/88)

Lieberman attacked his opponent, Senator Lowell Weicker, for his inconsistent votes on Social Security. Speaking at the New Britain Senior Center, Lieberman accused Weicker of cutting cost-of-living increases for Social Security recipients while voting to give himself and other U.S. Senators a cost-of-living increase as part of their salaries. Lieberman also promised never to vote to cut benefits. (Hartford Courant, 6/2/88)

Lieberman planned to play both sides of the political spectrum in order to win a Senate seat. Since, at various points in his career, Lieberman had been called “the darling of the Democratic liberal set, a centrist…a moderate, a fiscal conservative and a social progressive,” he and his strategists decided to employ a “left-right strategy” to beat Senator Lowell Weicker. The basic plan involved solidifying “Lieberman’s middle-of-the-road Democratic base, while picking off liberal Democrats and disaffected conservative Republicans.” (Hartford Courant, 6/19/88)

Lieberman advocated bold deficit-reduction policies. He said, “The president should bring together congressional leaders and the Federal Reserve Board to negotiate a deficit-reduction accord.” He also called on the president and Congress to pledge to eliminate the deficit in five years. In connection with his budget-balancing plan, Lieberman called for the following:
• Adoption of a two-year budget cycle that allows Congress to implement cost-reduction programs in off years;
• Scaling back defense spending and reducing spending for the B-1 bomber and the Strategic Defense Initiative;
• Passage of the trade bill and plant-closing legislation vetoed by President Reagan;
• Removal of trade barriers that restrict the export of Connecticut’s goods to foreign countries.
(Hartford Courant, 7/1/88)

Lieberman believed “18 years is enough for a senator.” “I don’t kid myself,” Lieberman said. “I’m an underdog. But it’s a winnable race. This is an incumbent a lot of people don’t like. There are lot of people who feel that 18 years is enough for a senator.” (New York Times, 7/10/88)

Lieberman leveled harsh attacks on his opponent, Republican Senator Lowell Weicker, for his inconsistent record and “political grandstanding.” In a series of negative hits, Lieberman accused Weicker of flip-flopping on important votes and “posturing on constitutional issues.” Weicker, however, pointed out that Lieberman advocated a form of school prayer, supported required recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools and received the endorsement of conservative spokesman William F. Buckley. (Hartford Courant, 9/17/88)

Lieberman stated that, after his opponent’s 3 terms in the Senate, Connecticut was ready for a new direction. Lieberman, addressing his failure to receive the labor endorsement, said, “It’s time for a change. It’s time for somebody fresh.” (New York Times, 9/17/88)

Lieberman believed his opponent was not a true “maverick.” He said, “For 18 years, my opponent has gotten away with saying he’s a maverick…Well, it’s about time the people really understood what a maverick is. It means you’re not ultimately accountable to anybody. You don’t even have to make commitments, even to the voters you represent. You just do whatever suits you personally whenever you want to do it. I look at his record and see a pattern of incredible inconsistency.” (New York Times, 9/17/88)

Lieberman said his opponent had poor attendance in the U.S. Senate, hurting middle class families and the environment as a result. “He has one of the worst attendance records in the United States Senate,” said Lieberman. “He’s missed votes that could have really helped middle-class taxpayers, could have helped clean up our environment, could have protected jobs.” (New York Times, 10/13/88)

Lieberman attacked Senator Lowell Weicker for missing Senate votes while giving paid speeches around the country. “It’s a unique responsibility to vote on the Senate floor,” Lieberman said. “So it’s particularly outrageous to be off accepting honoraria when you’re supposed to be on the floor of the Senate voting. That’s what the taxpayers are paying you for.” Weicker’s campaign manager claimed that Lieberman’s camp simply used “misstatements and half-truths” to spin Weicker’s personal financial information and record. (Hartford Courant, 10/14/88)

Lieberman assailed Senator Lowell Weicker for unethical behavior. Lieberman’s campaign and state Democratic party leaders described Weicker’s use of a friend’s private jet and leveled several conflict of interest charges against the Republican incumbent. (Hartford Courant, 10/20/88)

Lieberman responded to attacks on his attendance record in the state Senate in 1972-73. His opponent, Senator Weicker, claimed that Lieberman had hypocritically assailed his U.S. Senate record since he was only present for 71 percent of roll call votes in 1973 and 81 percent in 1972. Lieberman’s campaign claimed that Weicker misrepresented the record and pointed out that Lieberman’s missed votes were due to appendicitis in 1973 and observance of Jewish holidays in 1972. In addition, Lieberman’s spokeswoman said, “The issue here is missing votes to collect speaking fees,” which Weicker allegedly did. She continued, “Joe Lieberman has never missed a vote to collect speaking fees.” (Hartford Courant, 10/22/88)

Lieberman received the endorsement of leading conservative writer William F. Buckley, Jr. Weicker claimed this reflected Lieberman’s attempts to redefine himself throughout the Senate campaign. Weicker said, “He put on a new suit for this election. Everybody in the state knows that…You cannot change your image in a matter of months.” (Hartford Courant, 10/28/88)

Lieberman accused his opponent of not being a real member of either major party. “Lowell Weicker is not a real Republican,” Lieberman charged. “He’s not a real Democrat. He does what he wants when he wants to do it.” (Washington Post, 10/29/88)

Lieberman used negative campaigning to tear down Senator Lowell Weicker’s re-election bid. In early October, with his campaign behind in the polls, Lieberman released a 30-section television cartoon, which depicted Weicker as a bear sleeping through important votes. Though attack ads were common during the 1988 presidential race, many believed this move represented a significant shift away from the gentlemanly modern-day history of statewide politics in Connecticut. (New York Times, 11/2/88)

Lieberman’s campaign believed that, after electing a senator to serve for 18 years, “it’s time for a change.” Marla Romash, Lieberman’s issues and communications director, said, “For a three-term incumbent, after 18 years, to be in trouble as deep as [Lowell Weicker] is in a week before the election clearly shows the people of Connecticut believe it’s time for a change.” (Associated Press, 11/3/88)

Lieberman’s more conservative positions led to confusion over whether he or his opponent was the true liberal in the Senate race. In particular, Lieberman tilted to the right on foreign policy matters, supporting tough talk on the Soviet Union, a hands-off approach to Cuba and linkage of Central American peace with U.S.-Soviet negotiations. He also supported President Reagan’s military engagements in Libya and Grenada, while Republican Lowell Weicker remained a chief critic of the administration’s moves. (Hartford Courant, 11/3/88)

Lieberman accused Lowell Weicker of advocating a tax policy that hurt “the people who can afford it the least.” Lieberman specifically assailed Weicker’s backing of the gasoline tax and stated that “Lowell Weicker’s [overall] tax policy is simple: Let the middle class pay.” (Hartford Courant, 11/3/88)

Lieberman’s position on school prayer became a major issue late in the electoral contest. Senator Weicker’s campaign staff said, “Lieberman cast a vote in favor of school prayer,” referring to a state Senate vote from 1975 on an amendment to require a moment of silence in public schools. However, a Lieberman spokesperson responded, saying, “The record is clear that he did not vote for organized school prayer…The debate and the language of the bill itself talk about a moment of silence…To imply that he (Lieberman) is for organized prayer is deceptive advertising.” (New York Times, 11/3/88)

Lieberman took a “no honorarium” pledge during his 1988 Senate campaign. Assailing his opponent for accepting more than $235,000 in speaking fees between 1981 and 1988, Lieberman pledged that “when I am elected…I will not accept speaking fees. I will not miss votes to collect speaking fees.” (Hartford Courant, 11/4/88)
Lieberman seemed more like a Republican to some voters. A poll released immediately prior to the 1988 election showed an overwhelming number of undecideds in the Connecticut Senate race. It also underscored an overall theme of the campaign, namely, that Republican Lowell Weicker and Democrat Lieberman sometimes appear to have switched parties. “In a way, Lieberman is more of a Republican…and that’s confusing,” said one traditionally conservative voter. (Hartford Courant, 11/5/88)

Lieberman tried to spin pre-election poll numbers that had him trailing Senator Weicker 42 percent to 36 percent. In an attempt to turn the poll results in his favor, Lieberman said, “Remarkably, you have an 18-year incumbent who 60 percent of the people don’t support.” (New York Times, 11/6/88)

Lieberman claimed his opponent underestimated him in their Senate contest. “Weicker took me for granted, and he thought he was going to stroll in,” Lieberman said. “When he realized that this wasn’t going to happen, he started a negative campaign, a campaign filled with distortions.” (New York Times, 11/7/88)

Lieberman declared victory in his close Senate race against Lowell Weicker. Lieberman was ebullient at his campaign celebration in Hartford, CT, saying, “People wanted a change.” He added, “Thank you [Senator Weicker] for serving 18 years but it’s time for someone new.” (New York Times, 11/9/88)

Lieberman faced harsh criticism for his staff choices following his 1988 election to the Senate. The Hartford Courant criticized Lieberman for appointing “several prominent lobbyists” and representatives of various interest groups to his transition advisory committee. The newspaper wrote that “Having an advisory group composed in large part of ax-grinders may create the impression that the senator-elect actively welcomes the attention of special interests.” The editors continued, “A member of Congress isn’t required to turn a deaf ear to special interests, but there’s a difference between listening to them and inviting them into the inner circle.” (Hartford Courant, 12/11/88)

SMALL BUSINESS

Lieberman generally has a strong record on small business issues. One of his priorities in his first term in the Senate was making it easier for Connecticut small companies to borrow money, and he was a sponsor of the Small business Paperwork Reduction Act. He chaired the Small Business Committee, and promoted his efforts on behalf of small businesses during his campaigns.

However, there are some noteworthy votes against small business interests in Lieberman’s record. He opposed requiring a cost-benefit analysis for regulations affecting small business and voted against exempting small businesses from civil penalties resulting from Y2K Bug problems. Lieberman also opposes association health plans, a Republican-backed plan to allow small businesses to band together to purchase health insurance.

The most recent employment data in Connecticut indicate a decline in small business. Companies with less than 500 employees experienced a net loss of 7,790 jobs, and the number of self-employed people decreased overall by 4.3 percent. Commercial bank lenders, an important source of small business loans, have declined in Connecticut since 1995, from 40 to 25 in 2004.

KEY ISSUES

• Recent economic data indicate that small business has declined in Connecticut during Lieberman’s tenure in the Senate.

o From 2001 to 2002, Connecticut experienced a net job loss of 7,790 for firms of 500 employees or less. (U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Advocacy)

o In 2004, the number of self-employed people decreased overall by 4.3 percent, from 183,804 to 175,823. (U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Advocacy)

o Commercial bank lenders, an important source of small business loans, have declined in Connecticut over the past 10 years, from 40 in 1995 to 25 in 2004. (U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Advocacy)

o Proprietors’ income, a partial measure of small business income, increased by 5.1 percent in Connecticut in 2004, compared to 7.3 percent for the entire country. (U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Advocacy)

• Lieberman opposed exempting small businesses from civil penalties resulting from the Y2K bug. Lieberman voted against an amendment that exempted small businesses from certain civil penalties for first-time violations of federal regulations caused by Year 2000 computer failures. (S 96, Senate Vote 164, 6/15/99)

• Lieberman opposed performing a cost-benefit analysis on regulations affecting small business owners. Lieberman voted against a Democratic amendment that required agencies to conduct a cost-benefit analysis for proposed rules that have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small businesses. (S 343, Senate Vote 298, 7/10/95)

• Lieberman opposes association health care plans. Lieberman said that allowing small businesses to band together to purchase health would provide massive loopholes to state requirements for health plan coverage. “America has a health insurance problem but [this] bill is not a cure,” Lieberman said. “It does incalculable harm.” (Connecticut Post, 5/14/06)

SMALL BUSINESS LEGISLATION

Lieberman Opposed Lessening the Regulatory Burden on Small Business

S 4 Senate Vote 53 R 0-44; D 31-23 3/10/94

Lieberman voted for the Glenn, D-Ohio, motion to table the Wallop, R-Wyo., amendment to amend the Regulatory Flexibility Act to strengthen the analysis of the regulatory burden on small businesses and municipalities. The Senate rejected the motion 31-67.

Lieberman Opposed Requiring Cost-Benefit Analyses for Regulations Affecting Small Business

S 343 Senate Vote 298 R 46-4; D 14-32 7/10/95

Lieberman voted against the Nunn, D-Ga., amendment to require agencies to conduct a cost-benefit analysis for proposed rules that have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small businesses. The Senate adopted the motion 60-36.

Lieberman Opposed Exempting Small Businesses from Civil Penalties Related to Y2K Problems

S 96 Senate Vote 164 R 54-0; D 17-28 6/15/99

Lieberman voted against the Gregg, R-N.H., amendment that exempted small businesses from certain civil penalties for first-time violations of federal regulations caused by Year 2000 computer failures. The Senate adopted the amendment 71-28.


Lieberman Opposed Providing Small Businesses Priority in Bankruptcy Claims

S 420 Senate Vote 17 R 49-0; D 9-41 3/7/01

Lieberman voted for the Hatch, R-Utah, motion to table the Leahy, D-Vt., amendment that provided small business creditors priority in bankruptcy claims. The Senate agreed to the motion 58-41.


ATTENDANCE AND MISSED VOTES

Lieberman has an exceptionally poor attendance record since he started in the U.S. Senate in 1991. Overall, he has missed more than 400 votes on the U.S. Senate floor. In 2000, Lieberman missed 63 votes campaigning with Al Gore. In 2003, he missed 250 roll call votes leaving him with a 46 percent attendance rate.

While campaigning and traveling in 2000 and 2003, Lieberman missed key votes on legislation dealing with military and defense appropriations, energy and water appropriations, China trade, prescription benefits, homeland security and education appropriations.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman has missed more than 400 roll call votes on the floor of the U.S. Senate. (Congressional Record)

• Lieberman missed 250 votes in 2003, giving him an attendance record of just 46 percent. While campaigning with Al Gore in 2000, Lieberman missed 63 votes for an attendance record of just 79 percent. (Congressional Quarterly Member Profile)

• Lieberman was in Missouri when he missed votes on fiscal 2001 energy and water appropriations annual certification, energy technology, religious freedom in China Trade and fiscal 2001 energy and water appropriations for the Missouri River. (HR 4733, Senate Vote 237; HR 4444, Senate Vote 232, 234, 235, 236; Hartford Courant, 9/7/00).

• Lieberman was in Ohio when he missed votes to on human rights and prison labor products in China trade. (HR 4444, Senate Votes 238, 239; Associated Press, 9/12/00)

• Lieberman was in Massachusetts when he missed votes on U.S. businesses, forced abortions, nonproliferation of weapons, organ harvesting and import relief in China trade. (HR 4444, Senate Votes, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245; Associated Press, 9/13/00)

• Lieberman was in New York when he missed votes on the cereal and soybean trade imbalance, environmental protection, missing prisoners of war and foreign investment information in China. (HR 4444, Senate Vote 247, 248, 249, 250; Associated Press, 9/14/00)

• Lieberman was in Florida when he missed votes on Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations for HIV/AIDS funding, intelligence and overseas military funding. (HR 2658, Senate Vote 286, 287, 288, 289; Associated Press, 8/16/03)

• Lieberman was in California and New York when he missed votes on prescription drug benefits including: drug patents, premium cap, drug cost disclosure, employer compensation, drug cost coverage, benefit availability, two-year fallback plan, open enrollment period, Congressional prescription coverage, Canadian price equity, premium reduction, drug advertisements and health centers. (S 1, Senate Vote 228, 229, 230, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246; Associated Press, 6/19/04; Hartford Courant, 6/25/03)

Senate Attendance
Below is a chart that shows the amount of roll call votes Lieberman missed voting on per year.

Year # Missed
1991 6
1993 2
1994 9
1995 6
1996 2
1997 1
1999 5
2000 63
2001 6
2002 6
2003 250
2004 14
2005 18
2006 19
Total 407

Missed Votes Summary
Below is a table listing each of Lieberman’s missed votes since 1991. Lieberman’s location at the time of the vote has been indicated in some instances.

Date Bill/Res. Vote Number Description Result Reason for Absence Documentation
5/14/1991 Senate Vote 56 Convention on Training, Certification and Watchkeeping Standards for Seafarers Adopted 97-0
5/14/1991 Senate Vote 57 Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships Adopted 97-0
5/14/1991 Senate Vote 58 Safety of Life at Sea and Load Line Conventions Adopted 97-0
5/14/1991 Senate Vote 59 Convention Concerning the Abolition of Forced Labor - Adoption Adopted 97-0
5/14/1991 Senate Vote 60 Central American Democracy and Development Act - Free Market Promotion Rejected 38-58
5/14/1991 Senate Vote 61 Central American Democracy and Development Act - Passage Passed 87-9
6/29/1993 Senate Vote 191 Confirmation of President Clinton's nomination of Ashton B. Carter of Massachusetts to be Assistant Secretary of Defense. Confirmed 76-18
3/26/1994 Senate Vote 86 Goals 2000: Educate America - Conference Report Adopted 63-22
3/26/1994 Senate Vote 85 Goals 2000: Educate America - Cloture Motion Agreed to 62-33
3/26/1994 Senate Vote 84 Procedural Motion - motion to instruct the sergeant at arms to request the attendance of absent senators. Motion Agreed to 75-9
7/1/1994 Senate Vote 187 Fiscal 1995 Defense Authorization - Golan Heights Rejected 3-67
7/1/1994 Senate Vote 186 Fiscal 1995 Defense Authorization - Selective Service Motion Agreed to 50-30
7/1/1994 Senate Vote 185 Fiscal 1995 Defense Authorization - Airborne Jammer Motion Agreed to 68-14
7/15/1994 Senate Vote 205 Fiscal 1995 Military Construction Appropriations - Passage Passed 84-2
7/15/1994 Senate Vote 204 Fiscal 1995 Military Construction Appropriations - Seattle Land Conveyance Rejected 16-71
9/27/1994 Senate Vote 310 Fiscal 1995 Labor, HHS, Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 83-16
1/6/1995 S 2 Senate Vote 5 Congressional Compliance - Bridgestone Dispute Motion Agreed to 52-46
1/6/1995 S 4 Senate Vote 4 Congressional Compliance - Balanced-Budget Point Of Order Adopted 98-0
5/10/1995 HR 956 Senate Vote 161 Product Liability Overhaul - Passage Adopted 49-11
5/10/1995 HR 956 Senate Vote 160 Product Liability Overhaul - Strike Punitive Damages Cap Passed 61-37
5/10/1995 HR 956 Senate Vote 159 Product Liability Overhaul - CEO Salary Punitive Damage Cap Motion Agreed to 54-44
9/29/1995 HR 2076 Senate Vote 480 Fiscal 1996 Commerce-Justice-State Appropriations - Social Crime Prevention Motion Agreed to 78-20
5/22/1996 S Con Res 57 Senate Vote 146 Motion to Table Fiscal 1997 Budget Resolution - Asset Sales Motion Agreed to 56-23
5/22/1996 S Con Res 57 Senate Vote 145 Amendment to Fiscal 1997 Budget Resolution - Asset Sales Motion Rejected 30-53
9/8/1997 S 1061 Senate Vote 221 Fiscal 1998 Labor-HHS Appropriations - State Student Grants Adopted 84-4
5/24/1999 S 1059 Senate Vote 141 Fiscal 2000 Defense Authorization - War Crimes in Yugoslavia Adopted 90-0
6/28/1999 S 1234 Senate Vote 187 Fiscal 2000 Foreign Operations Appropriations - Cloture Motion Rejected 49-41
6/28/1999 S 1217 Senate Vote 186 Fiscal 2000 Commerce, Justice, State Appropriations - Cloture Motion Rejected 49-39
6/28/1999 S 1143 Senate Vote 185 Fiscal 2000 Transportation Appropriations - Cloture Motion Rejected 49-40
6/28/1999 S 1233 Senate Vote 184 Fiscal 2000 Agriculture Appropriations - Cloture Motion Rejected 50-37
9/7/2000 HR 4733 Senate Vote 237 Fiscal 2001 Energy and Water Appropriations - Passage Passed 93-1 Southwest State Missouri University, Missouri Hartford Courant, 9/7/00
9/7/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 236 China Trade - Annual Certification Rejected 13-81 Southwest State Missouri University, Missouri Hartford Courant, 9/7/00
9/7/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 235 China Trade - Energy Technology Rejected 32-64 Southwest State Missouri University, Missouri Hartford Courant, 9/7/00
9/7/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 234 China Trade - Religious Freedom Rejected 30-67 Southwest State Missouri University, Missouri Hartford Courant, 9/7/00
9/7/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 233 China Trade - Motion to Proceed Motion Agreed to 92-5 Southwest State Missouri University, Missouri Hartford Courant, 9/7/00
9/7/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 232 Fiscal 2001 Energy and Water Appropriations - Missouri River Rejected 45-52 Southwest State Missouri University, Missouri Hartford Courant, 9/7/00
9/12/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 239 China Trade - Human Rights Rejected 32-63 Ohio visiting schools Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/12/00
9/12/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 238 China Trade - Prison Labor Products Rejected 29-68 Ohio visiting schools Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/12/00
9/13/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 246 China Trade - Union Organization Rejected 22-74 Boston, Mass Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/13/00
9/13/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 245 China Trade - Congressional-Executive Commission Rejected 18-78 Boston, Mass Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/13/00
9/13/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 244 China Trade - U.S. Businesses Rejected 23-73 Boston, Mass Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/13/00
9/13/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 243 China Trade - Forced Abortions Rejected 43-53 Boston, Mass Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/13/00
9/13/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 242 China Trade - Nonproliferation of Weapons Motion Agreed to 65-32 Boston, Mass Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/13/00
9/13/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 241 China Trade - Organ Harvesting Rejected 39-66 Boston, Mass Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/13/00
9/13/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 240 China Trade - Import Relief Rejected 33-62 Boston, Mass Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/13/00
9/14/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 250 China Trade - Cereal and Soybean Trade Imbalance Rejected 16-81 New York, NY - Late Night Talk Show Circuit Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/14/00
9/14/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 249 China Trade - Environmental Protection Rejected 24-74 New York, NY - Late Night Talk Show Circuit Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/14/00
9/14/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 248 China Trade - Missing Prisoners of War Rejected 30-68 New York, NY - Late Night Talk Show Circuit Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/14/00
9/14/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 247 China Trade - Foreign Investment Information Rejected 6-90 New York, NY - Late Night Talk Show Circuit Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/14/00
9/19/2000 S 2045 Senate Vote 252 High Technology Visas - Cloture Motion Agreed to 97-1 Los Angelos, CA Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/19/00
9/19/2000 HR 4444 Senate Vote 251 China Trade - Passage Passed 83-15 Los Angelos, CA Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/19/00
9/20/2000 S 4516 Senate Vote 253 Fiscal 2001 Legislative Branch, Treasury-Postal Service Appropriations - Conference Report Rejected 28-69 Columbus/Cleveland, OH Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/21/00
9/21/2000 S 2796 Senate Vote 254 Water Resources Development - Everglades Operation and Maintenance Costs Rejected 24-71 Orlando, FL Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/21/00
9/25/2000 S 2796 Senate Vote 255 Water Resources Development - Passage Passed 85-1 Stamford, CT Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/26/00
9/26/2000 S 2045 Senate Vote 256 High Technology Visas - Cloture Motion Agreed to 94-3 Middletown, CT Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/25/00
9/27/2000 S 2045 Senate Vote 258 High Technology Visas - Increase Adopted 96-2 Wisconsin Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/27/00
9/27/2000 S 2045 Senate Vote 257 High Technology Visas - Suspend Rule XXII Motion Rejected 43-55 Wisconsin, Washington D.C. Associated Press State & Local Wire, 9/27/01;
9/28/2000 S 2045 Senate Vote 260 High Technology Visas - Cloture Motion Agreed to 92-3 Washington D.C Associated Press State and Local Wire, 9/28/00
9/28/2000 HJ res 109 Senate Vote 259 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 96-0 Washington D.C Associated Press State and Local Wire, 9/28/01
10/2/2000 HR 4733 Senate Vote 261 Fiscal 2001 Energy-Water Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 573-37 Kentucky Associated Press State and Local Wire, 10/2/00
10/3/2000 Senate Vote 263 Teilborg Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 95-0 Kentucky Associated Press State and Local, 10/3/00
10/3/2000 S 2045 Senate Vote 262 High Technology Visas - Passage Passed 96-1 Kentucky Associated Press State and Local, 10/3/00
10/5/2000 HR 4578 Senate Vote 266 Fiscal 2001 Interior Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 83-13 Centre College in Danville, Ky Associated Press State and Local Wire, 9/19/00
10/5/2000 HR 4578 Senate Vote 265 Fiscal 2001 Interior Appropriations - Cloture/Conference Report Motion Agreed to 89-8 Centre College in Danville, Ky Associated Press State and Local Wire, 9/19/00
10/5/2000 HJ Res 110 Senate Vote 264 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 95-1 Centre College in Danville, Ky Associated Press State and Local Wire, 9/19/00
10/6/2000 HR 4475 Senate Vote 267 Fiscal 2001 Transportation Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 78-10 Orlando, FL Associated Press State and Local, 10/6/00
10/11/2000 HR 3244 Senate Vote 269 Human Trafficking - Conference Report Motion Agreed to 95-0 Orlando, FL Associated Press State and Local, 10/6/00
10/11/2000 HR 3244 Senate Vote 268 Human Trafficking - Ruling of the Chair Other 90-5 Orlando, FL Associated Press State and Local, 10/6/00
10/12/2000 H J Res 111 Senate Vote 276 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 90-1 Texas Associated Press State and Local Wire 10/12/00
10/12/2000 HR 4205 Senate Vote 275 Defense Department Authorization - Conference Report Adopted 90-3 Texas Associated Press State and Local Wire 10/12/00
10/12/2000 HR 4205 Senate Vote 274 Fiscal 2001 Defense Department Authorization - Budget Act Waiver Motion Agreed to 84-9 Texas Associated Press State and Local Wire 10/12/00
10/12/2000 HR 4516 Senate Vote 273 Fiscal 2001 Legislative Branch and Treasury-Postal Service Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 58-37 Texas Associated Press State and Local Wire 10/12/00
10/12/2000 HR 4635 Senate Vote 272 Fiscal 2001 VA-HUD Appropriations - Passage Passed 87-8 Texas Associated Press State and Local Wire 10/12/00
10/12/2000 HR 4635 Senate Vote 271 Fiscal 2001 VA-HUD Appropriations - Clean Rivers Motion Agreed to 56-39 Texas Associated Press State and Local Wire 10/12/00
10/12/2000 HR 4635 Senate Vote 270 Fiscal 2001 VA-HUD Appropriations - Drinking Water Standard Motion Agreed to 63-32 Texas Associated Press State and Local Wire 10/12/00
10/18/2000 HR 4461 Senate Vote 277 Fiscal 2001 Agriculture Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 86-8 New York, NY Hartford Court, 10/19/00
10/19/2000 HR 2415 Senate Vote 279 Bankruptcy Overhaul - Motion to Proceed Motion Agreed 89-0 New York, NY Associated Press State and Local Press 10/19/00
10/19/2000 HR 4635 Senate Vote 278 Fiscal 2001 VA-HUD and Energy-Water Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 85-8 New York, NY Associated Press State and Local Press 10/19/01
10/24/2000 Nashville, TN Hartford Courant, 10/25/00
10/25/2000 H J Res 115 Senate Vote 283 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 87-2 Nashville, TN Hartford Courant, 10/26/00
10/25/2000 S 2508 Senate Vote 282 Colorado Ute Indian Water Rights Settlement - Passage Passed 85-5 Nashville, TN Hartford Courant, 10/26/00
10/25/2000 S 2508 Senate Vote 281 Colorado Ute Indian Water Rights - Animas-La Plata Project Passed 56-34 Nashville, TN Hartford Courant, 10/26/00
10/25/2000 HR 4811 Senate Vote 280 Fiscal 2001 Foreign Operations Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 65-27 Nashville, TN/Albuquerque, N.M Hartford Courant, 10/26/00; 10/27/00
10/26/2000 HJ Res 116 Senate Vote 287 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 94-1 Nashville, TN/Albuquerque, N.M Hartford Courant, 10/26/00; 10/27/00
10/26/2000 HR 2614 Senate Vote 286 Tax Cut Package - Motion to Proceed Motion Agreed to 55-40 Nashville, TN/Albuquerque, N.M Hartford Courant, 10/26/00; 10/27/00
10/26/2000 HR 782 Senate Vote 285 Seniors Programs - Passage Passed 94-0 Nashville, TN/Albuquerque, N.M Hartford Courant, 10/26/00; 10/27/00
10/26/2000 HR 782 Senate Vote 284 Seniors Programs - Background Checks Rejected 25-69 Nashville, TN/Albuquerque, N.M Hartford Courant, 10/26/00; 10/27/00
10/27/2000 HJ Res 117 Senate Vote 290 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 86-3 Washington State Associated Press, State and Local Wire, 10/27/00
10/27/2000 HR 4942 Senate Vote 289 Fiscal 2001 Commerce, Justice, State and District of Columbia Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 49-42 Washington State Associated Press, State and Local Wire, 10/27/00
10/27/2000 HR 2415 Senate Vote 288 Bankruptcy Overhaul - Motion to Proceed Passed 87-1 Washington State Associated Press, State and Local Wire, 10/27/00
10/28/2000 HJ Res 118 Senate Vote 291 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 67-2 Unknown Unknown
10/29/2000 HJ Res 119 Senate Vote 292 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 67-1 Warren, MI Hartford Courant, 10/30/00
10/30/2000 HJ Res 120 Senate Vote 293 Continuing Resolution - Passage Passed 70-1
11/1/2000 HR 2415 Senate Vote 294 Bankruptcy Overhaul - Cloture Motion Rejected 53-30 Maine Hartford Courant, 11/1/00
5/14/2001 S 1 Senate Vote 102 ESEA Reauthorization - School Safety Center Adopted 74-23
5/14/2001 S 1 Senate Vote 101 ESEA Reauthorization - Language and Life Skills Adopted 96-0
10/17/2001 HR 2217 Senate Vote 304 Fiscal 2002 Interior Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 95-3 Washington D.C., attending anti-terrorist hearing Hartford Courant, 11/18/01
12/5/2001 S 1731 Senate Vote 352 Agriculture Overhaul - Cloture Motion Agreed to 73-26
12/5/2001 HR 10 Senate Vote 351 Railroad Retirement - Passage Passed 90-9
12/5/2001 HR 10 Senate Vote 350 Pension Contribution Limits - Railroad Retirement Motion Agreed to 89-19
1/23/2002 Senate Vote 1 Procedural Motion - Require Attendance Motion Agreed to 88-6
5/13/2002 Senate Vote 108 Cassell Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 67-20 Uconn, Connecticut, Press Conference Hartford Courant, 5/14/02
5/23/2002 HR 3009 Senate Vote 129 Andean Trade - Human Rights Motion Rejected 42-53
6/6/2002 HR 4775 Senate Vote 142 Fiscal 2002 Supplemental Appropriations - AIDS Fund Adopted 79-14
6/10/2002 S Res 272 Senate Vote 146 Varela Project - Adoption Adopted 87-0
9/9/2002 Senate Vote 211 Marra Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 82-0
1/22/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 18 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - US Airways Pension Plan Motion Agreed to 64-31 New Hampshire Associated Press, 1/22/03
1/22/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 17 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - African Famine Relief Motion Agreed 48-46 New Hampshire Associated Press, 1/22/03
1/22/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 16 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - Drought Relief Rejected 39-56 New Hampshire Associated Press, 1/22/03
1/22/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 15 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - Drought Relief Adopted 59-35 New Hampshire Associated Press, 1/22/03
1/22/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 14 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - Unemployment Insurance Motion Rejected 45-49 New Hampshire Associated Press, 1/22/03
1/22/2003 Senate Vote 13 Ridge Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 94-0 New Hampshire Associated Press, 1/22/03
1/23/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 23 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - Yazoo Basin Pump Project Motion Agreed to 50-48
1/23/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 22 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - Devil's Lake Outlet Construction Motion Agreed to 62-34
1/23/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 21 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - Medicare Funding Motion Rejected 41-56
1/23/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 20 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - Minority Health Services Motion Agreed to 51-46
1/23/2003 H J Res 2 Senate Vote 19 Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations - International Military Education and Training Rejected 36-61
2/24/2003 S 151 Senate Vote 35 Virtual Child Pornography - Passage Passed 84-0 Florida, AFL-CIO meeting Associated Press State & Local Wire, 2/24/03
2/27/2003 Senate Vote 37 Procedural Motion - Require Attendance Motion Agreed to 74-1 New Hampshire Hartford Courant, 2/28/03
2/27/2003 Senate Vote 36 Procedural Motion - Require Attendance Motion Agreed to 73-1 New Hampshire Hartford Courant, 2/28/03
3/3/2003 Senate Vote 38 Horn Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 89-0
3/10/2003 Senate Vote 44 Frost Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 91-0
3/25/2003 S Con Res 23 Senate Vote 82 Fiscal 2004 Budget Resolution - Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit Parity Rejected 46-51
3/25/2003 S Con Res 23 Senate Vote 81 Fiscal 2004 Budget Resolution - Military Health Care Rejected 46-51
3/25/2003 S Con Res 23 Senate Vote 80 Fiscal 2004 Budget Resolution - Health Agency Spending Adopted 96-1
3/27/2003 Senate Vote 111 Selna Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 97-0
3/27/2003 HR 1307 Senate Vote 110 Military Tax Breaks - Passage Passed 97-0
3/27/2003 S Con Res 30 Senate Vote 109 Coalition Member Support - Adoption Adopted 97-0
3/28/2003 New Hampshire Associated Press State and Local Wire, 3/28/03
3/31/2003 Senate Vote 112 Springmann Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 93-0
4/1/2003 Senate Vote 113 Tymkovich Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 58-41
4/3/2003 S 762 Senate Vote 125 Fiscal 2003 War Supplemental - Passage Passed 93-0
4/3/2003 S 762 Senate Vote 124 Fiscal 2003 War Supplemental - Iraqi Food Assistance Adopted 67-26
4/7/2003 Senate Vote 126 Carney Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 80-0
4/10/2003 Senate Vote 133 Swimmer Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 72-24 Iowa Associated Press State and Local 4/10/03
4/10/2003 S 151 Senate Vote 132 Protections for Children - Conference Report Adopted 98-0 Iowa Associated Press State and Local 4/10/04
4/29/2003 Senate Vote 135 Sutton Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 52-41
5/1/2003 Senate Vote 138 Prado Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 97-0 Florida Associated Press State and Local Wire 4/30/03
5/1/2003 Senate Vote 137 Owen Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 52-44 Florida Associated Press State and Local Wire 4/30/04
5/5/2003 Senate Vote 140 Estrada Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 52-39 Cleveland, OH Associated Press State and Local Wire, 5/5/03
5/5/2003 Senate Vote 139 Cook Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 66-25 Cleveland, OH Associated Press State and Local Wire, 5/5/03
5/6/2003 Senate Vote 141 Altonaga Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 91-0
5/8/2003 S 113 Senate Vote 146 FISA Warrants - Passage Passed 90-4 Miami, FL Hartford Courant 5/9/03
5/8/2003 S 113 Senate Vote 145 FISA Warrants - Feinstein Substitute Rejected 35-59 Miami, FL Hartford Courant 5/9/03
5/8/2003 Senate Vote 144 Owen Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 52-45 Miami, FL Hartford Courant 5/9/03
5/8/2003 Senate Vote 143 Estrada Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 54-53 Miami, FL Hartford Courant 5/9/03
5/8/2003 Senate Vote 142 Treaty: NATO Expansion Treaty - Adoption Adopted 96-0 Miami, FL Hartford Courant 5/9/03
5/19/2003 Senate Vote 184 Hicks Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 86-0 Mass, Fundraiser Hartford Courant 5/21/03
5/21/2003 S 1050 Senate Vote 188 Fiscal 2004 Defense Authorization - Low-Yield Nuclear Weapons Adopted 96-0
6/2/2003 Mass, Fundraiser Associated Press Local and State Wire 6/3/03
6/3/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 204 Energy Policy - Ethanol Requirement Exclusion Rejected 34-62
6/3/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 203 Energy Policy - Ethanol Requirement Exclusion Rejected 35-60
6/4/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 206 Energy Policy - Ethanol Requirement Exclusion Rejected 37-58 Detroit, MI Associated Press State and Local Wire 6/4/03
6/4/2003 HR 1588 Senate Vote 205 Fiscal 2004 Defense Authorization - Base Closures Rejected 42-53 Detroit, MI Associated Press State and Local Wire 6/4/03
6/5/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 208 Energy Policy - Liability Standards Rejected 38-57 Connecticut, Jewish Holiday Hartford Courant, 6/4/03
6/5/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 207 Energy Policy - Ethanol Requirement Exclusion Rejected 26-69 Connecticut, Jewish Holiday Hartford Courant, 6/4/04
6/9/2003 Senate Vote 211 Chertoff Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 88-1
6/10/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 214 Energy Policy - Nuclear Power Plants Rejected 48-50 Hartford, CT Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/10/03
6/11/2003 Senate Vote 215 Wesley Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 96-0
6/12/2003 HR 2115 Senate Vote 225 Fiscal 2004 FAA Reauthorization - Passage Passed 94-0 Connecticut Hartford Courant, 6/13/03
6/12/2003 S 824 Senate Vote 224 Fiscal 2004 FAA Reauthorization - Foreign Repair Stations Rejected 42-52 Connecticut Hartford Courant, 6/13/03
6/12/2003 S 824 Senate Vote 223 Fiscal 2004 FAA Reauthorization - Pilot Age Requirements Rejected 44-52 Connecticut Hartford Courant, 6/13/03
6/12/2003 S 824 Senate Vote 222 Fiscal 2004 FAA Reauthorization - Privatization Ban Adopted 56-41 Connecticut Hartford Courant, 6/13/03
6/12/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 221 Energy Policy - Off-Shore Drilling Rejected 45-53 Connecticut Hartford Courant, 6/13/03
6/13/2003 Senate Vote 226 Pate Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 71-0 Connecticut Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/13/03
6/18/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 227 Prescription Drug Benefit - Government-Run Plan Rejected 37-58 Oklahoma Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/18/03
6/19/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 230 Prescription Drug Benefit - Drug Patents Adopted 94-1 New York Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/19/03
6/19/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 229 Prescription Drug Benefit - Premium Cap Rejected 39-56 New York Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/19/03
6/19/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 228 Prescription Drug Benefit - Drug Cost Disclosure Adopted 95-0 New York Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/19/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 241 Prescription Drug Benefit - Employer Compensation Rejected 41-55 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 240 Prescription Drug Benefit - Drug Cost Coverage Rejected 41-54 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 239 Prescription Drug Benefit - Benefit Availability Rejected 41-54 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 238 Prescription Drug Benefit - Two-Year Fallback Plan Motion Agreed to 51-45 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 237 Prescription Drug Benefit - Congressional Prescription Coverage Adopted 93-3 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 236 Prescription Drug Benefit - Cost Sharing Extension Motion Agreed to 54-42 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 235 Prescription Drug Benefit - Canadian Price Equity Motion Agreed to 66-31 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/24/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 234 Prescription Drug Benefit - Open Enrollment Period Motion Agreed to 55-42 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/25/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 246 Prescription Drug Benefit - Cost-Effectiveness Studies Rejected 43-52 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/25/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 245 Prescription Drug Benefit - Durbin Substitute Rejected 39-56 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/25/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 244 Prescription Drug Benefit - Premium Reduction Rejected 39-56 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/25/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 243 : Prescription Drug Benefit - Drug Advertisements Rejected 26-69 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/25/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 242 Prescription Drug Benefit - Health Centers Adopted 94-1 California Harford Courant, 6/25/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 261 Prescription Drug Benefit - Means Test Motion Rejected 38-59 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 260 Prescription Drug Benefit - Alternative Plan Rejected 21-75 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 259 Prescription Drug Benefit - Retiree Fallback Plan Rejected 42-54 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 258 Prescription Drug Benefit - Medigap Policies Rejected 43-55 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 257 Prescription Drug Benefit - Medicaid Coverage Rejected 47-51 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 256 Prescription Drug Benefit - Immigrant Coverage Rejected 33-65 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 255 Prescription Drug Benefit - Experimental Drug Coverage Plans Adopted 71-26 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 254 Prescription Drug Benefit - Premium Reduction Rejected 39-59 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 253 Prescription Drug Benefit - Additional Disease Treatment Motion Agreed to 57-41 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 252 Prescription Drug Benefit - Alzheimer's Subsidy Adopted 98-0 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 251 Prescription Drug Benefit - Asset Test Adopted 69-29 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 250 Prescription Drug Benefit - Cancer Patient Coverage Motion Agreed 54-44 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 249 Prescription Drug Benefit - Cancer Care Adopted 97-1 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 248 Prescription Drug Benefit - Drug Advertisements Rejected 39-59 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/26/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 247 Prescription Drug Benefit - Disability Services Motion Agreed to 50-48 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
6/27/2003 S 1 Senate Vote 262 Prescription Drug Benefit - Passage Passed 76-21 California, Environmental Forum Associated Press State and Local Wire, 6/26/03
7/8/2003 Senate Vote 263 Campbell Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 92-0
7/9/2003 S 1162 Senate Vote 266 Child Tax Credit - Motion to Proceed Motion Agreed to 51-45 Washington D.C., Congressional Black Caucus Hartford Courant, 7/10/03
7/10/2003 S 925 Senate Vote 271 Fiscal 2004 State Department Reauthorization - Post-War Iraq Adopted 97-0
7/10/2003 S 925 Senate Vote 270 Fiscal 2004 State Department Reauthorization - HIV/AIDS Funding Adopted 78-18
7/10/2003 S 925 Senate Vote 269 Fiscal 2004 State Department Reauthorization - Unemployment Insurance Motion Rejected 48-48
7/10/2003 S 925 Senate Vote 268 Fiscal 2004 State Department Reauthorization - Mexican Rural Development Adopted 54-43
7/11/2003 HR 2559 Senate Vote 274 Fiscal 2004 Military Construction Appropriations - Passage Passed 91-0
7/11/2003 HR 2657 Senate Vote 273 Fiscal 2004 Legislative Branch Appropriations - Passage Passed 85-7
7/11/2003 HR 2657 Senate Vote 272 Fiscal 2004 Legislative Branch Appropriations - AmeriCorps Motion Agreed to 71-21
7/14/2003 Senate Vote 275 Der-Yeghiayan Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 89-0 New York Associated Press, 7/14/03
7/15/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 277 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Troop Deployments Motion Agreed to 64-31 Washington D.C., Presidential Forum Hartford Courant, 7/16/03
7/15/2003 Senate Vote 276 Suko Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 94-0 Washington D.C., Presidential Forum Hartford Courant, 7/16/03
7/16/2003 HR 2685 Senate Vote 285 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Overseas Military Funding Motion Agreed to 79-16
7/16/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 284 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Iraqi Intelligence Commission Motion Agreed to 51-45
7/16/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 283 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Iraqi Reconstruction Motion Agreed to 52-43
7/16/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 282 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Military Health Care Adopted 93-2
7/16/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 281 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Iraq War Costs Motion Agreed to 50-45
7/16/2003 HR 2330 Senate Vote 280 Myanmar Sanctions - Passage Passed 94-1
7/16/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 279 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Military Detainees Motion Agreed to 52-42
7/16/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 278 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Cost of Iraq Operations Motion Agreed to 53-41
7/17/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 290 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Passage Passed 95-0 Miami Beach, FL Associated Press, 7/16/03
7/17/2003 Senate Vote 289 Duncan Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 93-0 Miami Beach, FL Associated Press, 7/16/03
7/17/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 288 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - HIV/AIDS Funding Motion Agreed to 71-24 Miami Beach, FL Associated Press, 7/16/03
7/17/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 287 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Intelligence Funding Motion Agreed to 62-34 Miami Beach, FL Associated Press, 7/16/03
7/17/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 286 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Overseas Military Funding Adopted 81-15 Miami Beach, FL Associated Press, 7/16/03
7/22/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 291 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Appropriations Increase Motion Rejected 43-50 Virginia Associated Press, 7/16/03
7/23/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 298 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Canadian Border Security Motion Rejected 45-51
7/23/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 297 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Chemical Plant Security Motion Rejected 43-52
7/23/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 296 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Firefighter Grants Motion Rejected 48-49
7/23/2003 Hr 2555 Senate Vote 295 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Explosive Device Detection Motion Rejected 45-51
7/23/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 294 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Port Security Motion Agreed to 50-48
7/23/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 293 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Emergency Management Planning Grants Motion Rejected 42-53
7/23/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 292 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Law Enforcement Costs Adopted 79-19
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 306 HR 2555: Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Passage Passed 93-1 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 305 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Lobbying Restrictions Rejected 46-46 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 304 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Transit Security Motion Rejected 44-50 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senat Vote 303 Fiscal l2004 Homeland Security Approprations - Federal Advisory Boards Rejected 46-50 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 302 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - High-Threat Urban Areas Rejected 48-48 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 301 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - High-Threat Urban Areas Motion Rejected 50-46 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 300 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - Maritime Security Motion Agreed to 51-45 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/24/2003 HR 2555 Senate Vote 299 Fiscal 2004 Homeland Security Appropriations - First Responder Funding Motion Rejected 41-54 Stratford, CT Hartford Courant, 7/24/03
7/28/2003 Senate Vote 307 Yeakel Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 91-0 Washington D.C. Associated Press, 7/23/03
7/29/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 310 Energy Policy - Fuel Economy Standards Adopted 66-30 Florida Associated Press, 7/29/03
7/29/2003 S 14 Senate Vote 309 Energy Policy - Fuel Economy Standards Rejected 32-65 Florida Associated Press, 7/29/03
7/29/2003 Senate Vote 308 Owen Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 53-43 Florida Associated Press, 7/29/03
7/31/2003 Senate Vote 321 Montalvo Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 95-0 New Hampshire Associated Press State & Local Wire, 8/1/03
7/31/2003 Senate Vote 320 Cohn Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 96-0 New Hampshire Associated Press State & Local Wire, 8/1/03
7/31/2003 HR 2738 Senate Vote 319 U.S.-Chile Trade - Passage Passed 65-32 New Hampshire Associated Press State & Local Wire, 8/1/03
7/31/2003 HR 2739 Senate Vote 318 U.S.-Singapore Trade - Passage Passed 66-32 New Hampshire Associated Press State & Local Wire, 8/1/03
7/31/2003 HR 6 Senate Vote 317 Energy Policy - Passage Passed 84-14 New Hampshire Associated Press State & Local Wire, 8/1/03
7/31/2003 Senate Vote 316 Pryor Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 53-44 New Hampshire Associated Press State & Local Wire, 8/1/03
9/3/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 324 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - IDEA Funding Motion Rejected 42-54 Washington D.C. Associated Press, 9/3/03
9/3/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 323 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Impact Aid Motion Rejected 52-42 Washington D.C. Associated Press, 9/3/03
9/3/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 322 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Hispanic Education Programs Motion Rejected 46-48 New Hampshire Associated Press State & Local Wire, 8/1/03
9/4/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 326 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Rural Education Grants Motion Rejected 52-43 Albuquerque, NM Associated Press, 9/4/03
9/4/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 325 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Job Training Funding Motion Rejected 46-49 Albuquerque, NM Associated Press, 9/4/03
9/5/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 329 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - School Construction Motion Rejected 43-46
9/5/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 328 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Bioterrorism Workforce Funding Motion Rejected 41-47
9/5/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 327 Colloton Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 94-1
9/9/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 333 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Head Start Motion Rejected 47-47 Baltimore, MD Associated Press, 9/9/03
9/9/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 332 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - HIV/AIDS Funding Motion Rejected 43-51 Baltimore, MD Associated Press, 9/9/03
9/9/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 331 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Higher Education Funding Motion Rejected 49-46 Baltimore, MD Associated Press, 9/9/03
9/9/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 330 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Title I Funding Motion Rejected 44-51 Baltimore, MD Associated Press, 9/9/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 347 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Passage Passed 94-0 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 346 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - NIH Funding Motion Rejected 52-43 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 345 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - West Nile Virus and Mosquito Control Motion Rejected 46-49 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 344 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - After School Programs Rejected 7-87 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 343 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Teacher Quality Programs Motion Rejected 43-51 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 342 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Education Funding Rejected 28-67 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 341 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Safe Children and Family Promotion Motion Rejected 49-46 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 340 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - After-school Programs Motion Rejected 46-49 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 339 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Financial Aid Eligibility Adopted 51-44 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 338 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - Library and Museum Program Funding Motion Rejected 47-49 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 337 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - National Immunization Program Motion Rejected 47-49 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 336 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - LIHEAP Assistance Motion Rejected 49-46 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/10/2003 HR 2660 Senate Vote 335 Fiscal 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations - AIDS Care Funding Motion Rejected 44-53 Hartford, CT Associated Press 9/10/03
9/16/2003 HR 2754 Senate Vote 350 Fiscal 2004 Energy and Water Appropriations - Passage Passed 92-0
9/16/2003 HR 2754 Senate Vote 349 Fiscal 2004 Energy and Water Appropriations - Advanced Nuclear Weapons Funding Motion Agreed to 53-41
9/17/2003 Senate Vote 353 Feuerstein Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 92-0
9/17/2003 Senate Vote 352 Proctor Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 92-0
9/17/2003 S 3 Senate Vote 351 "Partial-Birth" Abortion Ban - Disagree to House Amendment Motion Agreed to 93-0
9/22/2003 Senate Vote 355 Floyd Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 89-0
9/22/2003 Senate Vote 354 Conrad Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 89-0
9/23/2003 HR 2691 Senate Vote 362 Fiscal 2004 Interior Appropriations - Indian Health Service Funding Rejected 43-52
9/23/2003 HR 2691 Senate Vote 361 Fiscal 2004 Interior Appropriations - Competitive Sourcing Review Prohibition Rejected 44-51
9/23/2003 HR 2691 Senate Vote 360 Fiscal 2004 Interior Appropriations - Competitive Sourcing Annual Report Adopted 53-43
9/23/2003 HR 2691 Senate Vote 359 Fiscal 2004 Interior Appropriations - Judicial Review of Timber Sales Motion Agreed to 52-44
9/23/2003 HR 2691 Senate Vote 358 Fiscal 2004 Interior Appropriations - National Mall Advertisement Ban Adopted 92-4
9/23/2003 Senate Vote 357 Gibson Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 94-0
9/23/2003 HR 2691 Senate Vote 357 Fiscal 2004 Interior Appropriations - Indian Health Service Motion Rejected 49-45
9/24/2003 Senate Vote 363 Burns Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 91-0
9/25/2003 Senate Vote 367 Mosman Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 93-0
9/25/2003 Senate Vote 366 Sabraw Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 95-0
9/25/2003 HR 3161 Senate Vote 365 Do-Not-Call Registry - Passage Passed 95-0
9/25/2003 HR 2658 Senate Vote 364 Fiscal 2004 Defense Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 95-0
9/29/2003 Senate Vote 368 Bea Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 86-0
9/30/2003 Senate Vote 370 White Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 93-0
9/30/2003 Senate Vote 369 Crone Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 91-0
10/1/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 371 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Iraqi Reconstruction Confirmed 93-0
10/2/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 376 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Safety Equipment Motion Agreed to 49-37
10/2/2003 Senate Vote 375 Hayes Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 98-0
10/2/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 374 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Coalition Provisional Authority Motion Agreed to 56-42
10/14/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 380 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Reconstruction Financing Motion Agreed to 57-39
10/14/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 379 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Domestic Spending Motion Agreed to 59-35
10/14/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 378 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Iraqi Liberation Medal Rejected 47-48
10/14/2003 S 1053 Senate Vote 377 Genetic Nondiscrimination - Passage Passed 95-0
10/15/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 385 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Removal of Saddam Hussein Adopted 95-2
10/15/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 383 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Congressional Report Adopted 97-0
10/15/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 382 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Additional Army Personnel Motion Rejected 45-52
10/15/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 381 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Military Reserve Retirement Age Motion Rejected 47-49
10/16/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 389 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Reconstruction Loans Adopted 51-47
10/16/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 388 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Debt Forgiveness Adopted 98-0
10/16/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 387 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Global War on Terrorism Medal Adopted 97-1
10/16/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 386 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Stock Options Motion Agreed to 65-34
10/16/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 386 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Conditional Release of Funds Motion Agreed to 57-42
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 398 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Congressional Approval Motion Agreed to 49-46
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 397 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Involuntary Deployment of Troops Motion Agreed 82-15
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 396 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Reconstruction Funding Limit Motion Agreed to 51-47
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 395 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Intelligence Commission Motion Agreed to 67-32
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 394 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - HIV/AIDS Funding Motion Agreed to 56-43
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 393 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Meal Reimbursements Adopted 99-0
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 392 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Iraq Reconstruction Finance Authority Motion Agreed to 52-47
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 391 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - International Contribution Motion Agreed to 55-44
10/17/2003 S 1689 Senate Vote 390 Fiscal 2004 Supplemental for Iraq and Afghanistan - Salary Reimbursement for Federal Employees Adopted 96-3
10/20/2003 Senate Vote 401 Rodgers Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 82-0
10/27/2003 Senate Vote 411 Fischer Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 86-0
10/28/2003 HR 2800 Senate Vote 414 Fiscal 2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations - Coalition Provisional Authority Funds Rejected 44-53
10/28/2003 HR 2800 Senate Vote 413 Fiscal 2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations - State Department Reauthorization Motion Rejected 40-57
10/28/2003 Senate Vote 412 Leavitt Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 88-8
10/29/2003 HR 2800 Senate Vote 415 Fiscal 2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations - Foreign Sources of Support for Hijackers Motion Rejected 43-54
10/30/2003 HR 2800 Senate Vote 432 Fiscal 2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations - Global AIDS Initiative Rejected 41-51
10/30/2003 HR 2800 Senate Vote 431 Fiscal 2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations - Global AIDS Initiative Motion Rejected 42-50
10/30/2003 HR 2800 Senate Vote 430 Fiscal 2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations - Abstinence Programs Rejected 45-47
10/30/2003 HR 2800 Senate Vote 429 Fiscal 2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations - HIV/AIDS Funding Adopted 89-1
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 428 Forest Thinning - Passage Passed 80-14
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 61-31 Varela Project - Adoption Motion Agreed to 61-31
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 426 Forest Thinning - Environmental Impact Statements Motion Agreed to 57-34
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 425 Forest Thinning - Old Growth Protection Motion Agreed 62-32
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 424 Forest Thinning - Fire Reduction Project Funds Motion Agreed 61-34
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 423 Forest Thinning - Judicial Review Motion Agreed to 62-33
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 422 Forest Thinning - Fuel Management Motion Agreed to 58-36
10/30/2003 HR 1904 Senate Vote 421 Forest Thinning - Fire Fighting Funds Motion Rejected 36-60
11/3/2003 HR 2691 Senate Vote 433 Fiscal 2004 Interior Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 87-2
11/4/2003 S 1753 Senate Vote 435 Credit Reporting Overhaul - Data Mining Motion Agreed to 61-32
11/4/2003 S 1753 Senate Vote 434 Credit Reporting Overhaul - Affiliate Sharing Motion Agreed to 70-24
11/5/2003 HR 2673 Senate Vote 440 Fiscal 2004 Agriculture Appropriations - Crop Losses Motion Rejected 40-55
11/5/2003 HR 2673 Senate Vote 439 Fiscal 2004 Agriculture Appropriations - Electricity Market Manipulation Adopted 57-40
11/5/2003 Senate Vote 438 Titus Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 97-0
11/5/2003 HR 2622 Senate Vote 437 Credit Reporting Overhaul - Passage Passed 95-2
11/5/2003 HR 2673 Senate Vote 436 Fiscal 2004 Agriculture Appropriations - Energy Transparency Rejected 41-56
11/6/2003 HR 2673 Senate Vote 444 Fiscal 2004 Agriculture Appropriations - Passage Passed 93-1
11/6/2003 HR 2673 Senate Vote 443 Fiscal 2004 Agriculture Appropriations - Country of Origin Labeling Motion Rejected 36-58
11/6/2003 HR 2673 Senate Vote 442 Fiscal 2004 Agriculture Appropriations - Conservation Reserve Rejected 38-56
11/6/2003 Senate Vote 441 Pryor Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 51-43
11/11/2003 HR 1588 Senate Vote 446 Fiscal 2004 Defense Authorization - Motion to Proceed Motion Agreed to 87-1
11/11/2003 HR 1828 Senate Vote 445 Syria Sanctions - Passage Passed 89-4
11/17/2003 HR 2115 Senate Vote 453 Fiscal 2004 FAA Reauthorization - Cloture Motion Rejected 45-43
11/18/2003 Senate Vote 455 Dorr Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 57-39
11/18/2003 Senate Vote 454 Dorr Nomination - Cloture Motion Rejected 57-39
11/25/2003 HR 1 Senate Vote 459 Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit - Conference Report Adopted 54-44
1/20/2004 HR 2673 Senate Vote 1 Fiscal 2004 Omnibus Appropriations - Cloture Motion Rejected 48-45
1/22/2004 HR 2673 Senate Vote 3 Fiscal 2004 Omnibus Appropriations - Conference Report Adopted 65-28
1/22/2004 HR 2673 Senate Vote 2 Fiscal 2004 Omnibus Appropriations - Cloture Motion Agreed to 61-32
1/27/2004 HR 3108 Senate Vote 4 Pension Funding - PBGC Liability Limit Motion Agreed to 67-25
1/28/2004 Senate Vote 6 Sharpe Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 95-0
1/28/2004 HR 3108 Senate Vote 5 Pension Funding - Passage Passed 86-9
2/2/2004 S 1072 Senate Vote 7 Surface Transportation - Cloture Motion Agreed to 75-11
2/4/2004 Senate Vote 8 Filip Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 96-0
3/12/2004 Senate Vote 59 Guirola Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 92-0
4/7/2004 S 1637 Senate Vote 67 Corporate Tax Overhaul - Cloture Motion Rejected 50-47
4/7/2004 S 2207 Senate Vote 66 Medical Malpractice - Cloture Motion Rejected 49-48
10/7/2004 S Res 445 Senate Vote 203 Senate Intelligence Oversight - Intelligence Committee Members Rejected 36-54
10/8/2004 Senate Vote 205 Procedural Motion - Require Attendance Motion Agreed to 85-4
10/8/2004 S Res 445 Senate Vote 204 Senate Intelligence Oversight - Cloture Motion Agreed to 88-3
3/17/2005 S Con Res 18 Senate Vote 66 Fiscal 2006 Budget Resolution - Community Development Block Grant Program Adopted 68-31
4/28/2005 H Con Res 95 Senate Vote 114 Fiscal 2006 Budget Resolution - Conference Report Other 52-47
4/29/2005 Senate Vote 115 Johnson Nomination - Cloture Motion Agreed 61-37
6/28/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 160 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Conference Report Language Rejected 33-59
6/28/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 159 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Indian Health Funding Motion Rejected 17-75
6/28/2005 HR 6 Senate Vote 158 Energy Policy - Passage Passed 85-12
6/29/2005 S 1307 Senate Vote 169 Central American Free Trade Agreement - Motion to Proceed Motion Agreed 61-34
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 168 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Passage Passed 94-0
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 167 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Family Travel to Cuba Motion Rejected 60-35
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 166 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Veterans Health Care Funding Adopted 96-0
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 165 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Veterans Heath Care Funding Adopted 96-0
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 164 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Tongass National Forest Rejected 39-59
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 163 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Indian Health Care Motion Rejected 47-51
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 162 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Pesticide Testing Adopted 60-37
6/29/2005 HR 2361 Senate Vote 161 Fiscal 2006 Interior-Environment Appropriations - Pesticide Testing Adopted 57-40
6/30/2005 S 1307 Senate Vote 170 Central American Free Trade Agreement - Passage Passed 54-45
7/1/2005 HR 2419 Senate Vote 172 Fiscal 2006 Energy and Water Appropriations - Passage Passed 92-3
7/1/2005 HR 2419 Senate Vote 171 Fiscal 2006 Energy and Water Appropriations - Nuclear Weapons Funding Rejected 43-53
6/22/2006 Senate Vote 187 Guilford Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 93-0
6/22/2006 S 2766 Senate Vote 186 Fiscal 2007 Defense Authorization - Passage Passed 96-0
7/25/2006 Senate Vote 213 Holmes Nomination - Confirmation Confirmed 67-30
7/31/2006 S 3711 Senate Vote 218 Gulf of Mexico Offshore Drilling - Cloture Motion Agreed to 72-23
8/1/2006 S 3711 Senate Vote 219 Gulf of Mexico Offshore Drilling - Passage Passed 71-25
8/2/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 222 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Brain Injury Funding Motion Agreed 54-43
8/2/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 221 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Equipment Funding Adopted 97-0
8/2/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 220 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Border Fencing Adopted 94-3
8/3/2006 HR 4 Senate Vote 230 Pension Overhaul - Passage Passed 93-5
8/3/2006 HR 5970 Senate Vote 229 Tax Package - Cloture Motion Rejected 56-42
8/3/2006 HR 5631 Senat Vote 228 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Navy Recruiting Stations and Data Security Adopted 96-0
8/3/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 227 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Cruise Missile Modification Program Rejected 31-67
8/3/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 226 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Earmark Report Adopted 96-1
8/3/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 225 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Immunity from Iraqi Law Adopted 97-0
8/3/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 224 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Travel Expenses Adopted 96-0
8/3/2006 HR 5631 Senate Vote 223 Fiscal 2007 Defense Appropriations - Conference Limit Motion Rejected 36-60
12/14/2006 S 1932 Senate Vote 353 Budget Reconciliation - Motion to Instruct Motion Agreed 66-26
12/14/2006 S 1932 Senate Vote 352 Budget Reconciliation - Motion to Instruct Motion Agreed 75-16
12/14/2006 S 1932 Senate Vote 351 Budget Reconciliation - Motion to Instruct Motion Agreed 64-27


PROPERTY

Joe Lieberman has owned several homes in the New Haven area over time. He sold his most recent Connecticut home in August 2006. Since that date, no new deeds in Lieberman’s name have been recorded and made publicly available in New Haven. Lieberman paid the property taxes late on his home at 10 Alston Avenue in 1996, incurring $83 worth of interest. In addition, he paid taxes late on a property at 550 Prospect Street Unit 10 in 2000, incurring over $250 in interest and penalties.

In addition to the home in New Haven, Lieberman owns a house in northwest Washington, DC. The home on Ivy Terrace Court was recently assessed at more than $1.2 million.

During his 2004 presidential campaign, Lieberman moved his entire family, including his elderly mother, to a basement apartment in Manchester, New Hampshire to be closer to the campaign.

KEY ISSUES

• Lieberman paid taxes late twice on his properties in Connecticut. In 1996, Lieberman paid his taxes late on his home at 10 Alston Avenue in New Haven. He incurred $83.61 in interest. In 2000, he paid taxes late on a property he owned at 550 Prospect Street Unit 10 in New Haven. He incurred $150 in late penalties and $137.61 in interest. (New Haven Clerk)

• Lieberman’s home in Washington, DC is worth over a million dollars. The most recent assessment of Lieberman’s home at 3821 Ivy Terrace Court in Washington placed its value at $1,276,650. (District of Columbia Tax Assessor)

• Lieberman moved his family to New Hampshire during the 2004 presidential campaign. During his 2004 campaign for president, Lieberman lived in a “basement apartment” in Manchester, New Hampshire. He moved his entire family, including his 89 year old mother, Marcia Lieberman to live in New Hampshire with him. (Hartford Courant, 1/28/04; 2/4/04)

PROPERTIES: WASHINGTON DC

3821 Ivy Terrace Court NW, Washington DC

11/10/94 Mortgaged from Chase Manhattan for $285,000
3/28/96 Marcel Femine appointed substitute trustee for mortgage
3/28/96 Mortgage released

11/27/95 Mortgaged from First Performance Mortgage Corporation for $289,500
2/13/97 Mortgage released

1/24/97 Mortgaged from BF Saul Mortgage Company for $287,000
4/30/98 Mortgage released

2/5/98 Mortgaged from BF Saul Mortgage Company for $284,000
7/23/01 Mortgage released

6/7/01 Mortgaged from Citimortgage, Inc for $278,000
12/17/02 Mortgage released

11/21/02 Mortgaged from First Horizon Home Loan Corporation for $275,000

(District of Columbia Recorder of Deeds)
ASSESSMENTS

Current Proposed (2007)
Land: $420,370 $447,870
Improvements: $689,330 $828,780
Total Value: $1,109,700 $1,276,650

(District of Columbia Tax Assessor)

PROPERTY TAXES

Tax Year Tax Penalty Interest Total
2005 $9,383.90 $0.00 $0.00 $9,383.90
2004 $1,327.98 $0.00 $0.00 $1,327.98
2003 $1,386.61 $0.00 $0.00 $1,386.61

(District of Columbia Tax Assessor)

PREVIOUSLY OWNED PROPERTIES: CONNECTICUT

10 Alston Avenue/2127 Chapel St, New Haven CT

6/15/83 Purchased from Hildegard Izenour for $166,000

6/15/83 Mortgaged from Connecticut Bank and Trust for $150,000
11/29/85 Mortgage released

12/9/85 Mortgaged from Home Bank and Trust Company for $150,000
1/4/93 Mortgage released

3/9/98 Mortgaged from American Savings Bank for $137,000

10/25/88 Mortgaged from Landmark Bank for $150,000
1/11/93 Mortgage released

12/24/92 Mortgaged from American National Bank for $145,000
2/8/96 Mortgage released

2/26/96 Mortgaged from Lafayette American Bank and Trust Company for $140,000

8/16/06 Sold to Brat Panico for $455,00

ASSESSMENT HISTORY

Year Value
1992 $88,357
1996 $150,486
2001 $180,740

PROPERTY TAXES

Tax Year Taxes Penalties Interest Total
1993 $5,402.08 $5,402.08
1994 $5,402.15 $5,402.15
1995 $5,401.72 $5,401.72
1996 $5,574.00 $83.61 $5,657.61
1997 $5,273.04 $5,273.04
1998 $5,259.50 $5,259.50
1999 $5259.50 $5,259.50
2000 $5,259.50 $5,259.50
2001 $6,647.62 $6,647.62
2002 $6,963.92 $6,963.92
2003 $7,144.66 $7,144.66
2004 $7,686.88 $7,686.88
2005 $8,263.16 $8,263.16

(New Haven Clerk)


1020-A Governor’s Row, New Haven CT

8/12/86 Purchased from Kosann-NEMCO Development for $102,500

9/4/90 Sold to Bertram Klebanow for $91,000

69 Colony Road, New Haven CT

5/24/68 Purchased from Sylvia and Samuel Bailey for $20,000

5/24/68 Mortgaged from General Bank and Trust Company for $20,000
11/4/88 Mortgage released

6/22/82 Transferred to Elizabeth Lieberman

1559-1561 Boulevard, New Haven CT

10/23/79 Purchased from Fred Sendroff.

11/12/82 Sold to Richard Bruno for $86,000


550 Prospect Street Unit 10, New Haven, CT

9/29/86 Purchased from David and Diane Jensen for $99,900

9/26/86 Mortgaged from First Federal Bank of Connecticut for $79,900
7/12/01 Mortgage released

4/13/01 James Segaloff appointed power of attorney for sale

5/15/01 Sold to Kenneth Hill for $48,500

ASSESSMENT HISTORY

Year Value
1992 $30,825
1996 $52,500
2001 $32,410

PROPERTY TAXES

Tax Year Taxes Penalties Interest Total
1993 $1,884.64 $1,884.64
1994 $1,884.64 $1,884.64
1995 $1,884.52 $1,884.52
1996 $1,944.60 $1,944.60
1997 $1,839.60 $1,839.60
1998 $1,834.88 $1,834.88
1999 $1,834.88 $1,834.88
2000 $1,834.88 $150.00 $137.61 $2,122.49

(New Haven Clerk)

140-150 Orange Street, New Haven CT

7/1/82 5/54ths interest purchased from Stephen Ahern and Edward Reynolds
Co-owners: Stephen P. Ahern
Edward M. Reynolds
Marvin K. Lender
James H. Segaloff
Susan W. Wolfson

7/2/82 Mortgaged with co-owners from Connecticut Savings Bank for $375,000
4/27/88 Mortgage released

7/2/82 Connecticut Savings Bank assigned as rent collector

7/2/82 Ownership share sold to 142 Orange Street Associates


CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS

Following are several examples of Lieberman’s record in Congress reflecting his campaign’s bank account. It includes total contributions over Lieberman’s career as calculated by the Center for Responsive Politics, in addition to contributions since 1999 reported to the Federal Election Commission.

CONTRIBUTIONS AND CONGRESS

Industry: Pharmaceutical and Health Products
Contributions: $438,740 according to the Center for Responsive Politics (CRP)
Lieberman’s Record in Congress:

During his U.S. Senate career, Lieberman provided significant assistance to the pharmaceutical industry. He helped pass an amendment that prevented low-priced generic drugs from being made available to consumers earlier, voted to table an amendment that required manufacturers of medical devices like syringes to be fully accurate in labeling and voted to make it optional, rather than mandatory, for producers of medical devices like pacemakers and artificial heart valves to track the performance of their products after implantation. (Time Magazine, 8/21/00)

Contributors since 1999:

Date Contributor Amount
3/15/00 Amgen Inc PAC $1,000
3/15/00 Bayer Corporation PAC $2,000
9/11/05 Bayer Corporation PAC $2,000
3/21/00 Aventis Pastour PAC $1,000
3/24/05 Abbott Labortories PAC $2,500
3/31/00 AstraZeneca PAC $1,000
3/21/00 Bristol Myers Squibb Company PAC $4,000
3/21/00 Bristol Myers Squibb Company PAC $2,000
3/30/05 Bristol Myers Squibb Company PAC $1,000
4/6/05 Bristol Myers Squibb Company PAC $1,000
7/9/06 Bristol Myers Squibb Company PAC $2,500
5/15/05 Caremark RX PAC $2,000
3/14/06 Caremark RX PAC $2,000
3/28/00 Eli Lilly and Company PAC $3,000
9/28/00 Eli Lilly and Company PAC $1,000
9/28/00 Eli Lilly and Company PAC $4,000
3/30/05 Eli Lilly and Company PAC $1,000
6/23/05 Eli Lilly and Company PAC $4,000
7/19/06 Eli Lilly and Company PAC $3,000
7/15/05 Express Scripts PAC $1,000
11/12/99 Merck PAC $1,000
11/18/99 Merck PAC $1,000
3/31/00 Merck PAC $1,000
3/30/05 Merck PAC $1,000
3/21/00 Novartis Employees Good Govt $1,000
7/23/01 Pfizer PAC $1,000
6/23/02 Pfizer PAC $5,000
7/10/04 Pfizer PAC $500
3/9/05 Purdue PAC $5,000
3/9/05 Purdue PAC $5,000
4/6/99 Hoffman LaNoche Good Government Committee $2,000
4/17/00 Hoffman LaNoche Good Government Committee $1,000
3/22/05 Gaxo Smith Xiina PAC $2,500
6/16/99 Genen PAC $2,000
6/7/05 Genen PAC $5,000
TOTAL $75,000

Industry: Commercial Banks
Contributions: $339,077 according to the CRP
Lieberman’s Record in Congress:

Lieberman voted for the Republican cloture motion on the controversial bankruptcy reform legislation passed in 2005. (S 256, Senate Vote 29, 3/8/05) Prior to the cloture vote, Sen. Edward Kennedy called the bankruptcy bill “mean-spirited and unfair,” “an embarrassment to anyone who votes for it” and “a bonanza for the credit card companies.” “That is why we must defeat tomorrow’s cloture vote and continue to seek a bill that is not an embarrassment to the Senate and the fundamental principal of fairness and simple justice for all,” Kennedy said. “It’s wrong, deeply wrong, for the Senate to rubber-stamp the greed of the credit card industry.” (Statement from the Office of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, 3/8/05)

Contributors since 1999:

Date Contributor Amount
3/21/05 Bank of America PAC $1,000
8/2/05 Bank of America PAC $1,000
6/23/05 Bank Rome PAC $500
3/24/05 BankUnited PAC $500
7/19/06 Citigroup Inc Group PAC $2,000
7/19/06 Citigroup Inc Group PAC $1,500
7/19/06 Citigroup Inc Group PAC $1,500
3/31/00 Credit Union Legislative Action Council of Credit Union National Assoc $1,000
9/7/00 Credit Union Legislative Action Council of Credit Union National Assoc $5,000
3/15/00 CT Bankers Assn PAC $500
1/11/06 CT Bankers Assn PAC $2,000
3/21/06 J.P. Morgan Chase & Co PAC $2,500
3/31/00 Lincoln Financial Corp PAC $2,000
3/31/00 Lincoln Financial Corp PAC $2,000
7/11/04 Lincoln Financial Corp PAC $1,000
3/30/05 Mellon Financial PAC $1,000
8/10/99 The Chase Manhattan Corp PAC $1,000
10/26/99 The Chase Manhattan Corp PAC $1,500
12/31/99 Webster Bank PAC $2,500
6/29/04 Capital One Asoc. PAC $1,000
3/28/06 Capital One Asoc. PAC $1,000
TOTAL $32,000

Industry: Securities and Investments
Contributions: $2,402,813 according to the CRP
Lieberman’s Record in Congress:

Lieberman voted against an amendment to hold liable individuals who aid and abet in securities fraud but were not defined as primary participants. (S 240, Senate Vote 286, 6/27/95) Lieberman, along with fellow Connecticut Senator Christopher Dodd, was one of seven Democrats to vote to table an amendment to deny “safe harbor” protection to officers of a corporation who make false or misleading forward-looking statements and then sell stock or otherwise benefit from the situation. (S 240, Senate Vote 294, 6/28/95)

Contributors since 1999:

Date Contributor Amount
5/24/99 Chicago Board Options Exchange $1,000
5/22/00 Chicago Board Options Exchange $1,000
7/10/00 Chicago Mercantile Exchange PAC $1,000
3/18/05 Chicago Mercantile Exchange PAC $4,000
3/18/05 Chicago Mercantile Exchange PAC $1,000
10/30/00 National Association of Surety Bond Prod $1,000
10/31/00 National Association of Surety Bond Prod $1,000
7/15/05 Oppenheimer Funds PAC $1,000
12/28/04 American Investment Group PAC $1,000
3/15/00 Bond Market Assoc PAC $1,000
3/21/05 Bond Market Assoc PAC $2,500
7/12/06 Bond Market Assoc PAC $1,500
7/19/06 Credit Swiss Securities PAC $5,000
7/28/00 Elect Financial Group Federal PAC $1,000
4/30/05 FMR PAC $1,000
9/13/05 Genworth Financial PAC $1,000
3/31/00 Household International Inc and Subsidary Companies PAC $1,000
3/31/00 Household International Inc and Subsidary Companies PAC $1,000
7/27/05 HSBC North America PAC $2,000
3/31/05 Ing US Pac $1,000
3/31/06 Ing US PAC $3,000
6/9/99 Investment Management PAC $1,000
3/18/05 KPMG Pac $1,000
6/30/05 Lehman Brothers PAC $2,500
6/30/05 Lehman Brothers PAC $5,000
3/15/06 Morgan Stanley PAC $2,500
12/29/99 NAIFA $4,000
2/25/05 NAIFA $1,000
3/31/00 National Venture Capital Assn PAC $4,000
6/30/04 National Venture Capital Assn PAC $2,000
4/17/05 National Venture Capital Assn PAC $1,000
4/17/05 National Venture Capital Assn PAC $1,000
3/14/06 National Venture Capital Assn PAC $3,000
5/20/05 New York Mercantile Exchange PAC $5,000
5/20/05 New York Mercantile Exchange PAC $5,000
3/28/00 Paine Webber Fund for Better Govt $1,000
TOTAL $72,000

Industry: Manufacturing and Distributing
Contributions: $511,586 according to the CRP
Lieberman’s Record in Congress:

Lieberman voted against requiring companies to notify employees and the Labor Department when jobs would be moved offshore, including the number of jobs affected, the relocation destination of those jobs and the reason for the relocation. He was one of just eight Democrats to vote to table the provisions. (S 1637, Senate Vote 83, 5/5/04)

Date Contributor Amount
6/6/06 BASF Corporation PAC $1,000
7/11/04 Emerson Electric Resonable Govt Fund $1,000
3/21/05 Emerson Electric Resonable Govt Fund $2,500
3/14/06 Emerson Electric Resonable Govt Fund $500
3/14/06 Emerson Electric Resonable Govt Fund $500
3/31/00 General Electric Company PAC $1,000
10/15/02 General Electric Company PAC $750
2/2/03 General Electric Company PAC $1,000
7/31/03 General Electric Company PAC $500
7/31/03 General Electric Company PAC $300
8/30/03 General Electric Company PAC $3,000
9/30/03 General Electric Company PAC $300
6/29/04 General Electric Company PAC $1,000
3/21/06 General Electric Company PAC $2,000
3/21/06 General Electric Company PAC $500
3/21/06 Fisher Scientific International PAC $2,000
3/21/06 Procter & Gamble PAC $2,500
6/29/04 Air Products PAC $500
2/29/00 BF Goodrich PAC $1,000
2/14/05 Machine Toolpac $2,500
3/24/06 Machine Toolpac $1,000
6/7/05 Goodrich PAC $1,000
9/28/05 Goodrich PAC $1,000
3/24/06 Goodrich PAC $1,000
TOTAL $28,350


Industry: Oil and Gas Companies
Contributions: $60,000+ according to the CRP
Lieberman’s Record in Congress:

Lieberman voted for President Bush’s energy bill, which provided billions in tax breaks to oil and gas companies while reducing clean air and water regulations. One provision took control of protecting the sound out of the hands of local and state officials. According to the highly-respected interest group Public Citizen, the energy bill “severely limits the ability of local communities and states to have adequate say over the siting of controversial Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) facilities.” The bill gave the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission exclusive authority to approve an application for an LNG terminal. The Connecticut Fund for the Environment has said that the proposed Broadwater LNG plant would “endanger our environment, negating years of efforts to restore the Sound.” (HR 6, Senate Vote 213, 7/29/05; Public Citizen; Connecticut Fund for the Environment)

Contributions since 1999:

Date Contributor Amount
3/15/00 American Gas Association $1,000
2/17/99 Atlantic Richfield $1,000
12/6/05 BP $1,000
6/20/99 Connecticut Natural Gas $500
10/18/00 Conoco Inc $1,000
5/17/99 Consolidated Natural Gas $1,000
4/26/99 Interstate Natural Gas Association of America $1,000
1/21/99 Koch Industries $2,000
7/19/99 Koch Industries $1,000
4/7/00 Koch Industries $1,000
6/21/00 Koch Industries $5,000
9/2/05 Occidental Petroleum $1,000
1/6/99 Texaco $1,000
4/12/99 Texaco $1,000
5/6/99 Texaco $1,000
2/23/00 Tosco Corp $1,000
TOTAL $20,500


Industry: Insurance
Contributions: $830,577 according to the CRP
Lieberman’s Record in Congress:

Lieberman opposed President Clinton’s 1993 health care reform plan. During Lieberman’s 1994 reelection campaign, he was criticized for siding with a “conservative plan favored by insurance interests – who have given heavily to his campaign. The plan would cover fewer people and require less government involvement.” The proposal did not contain some of the regulatory features of the president’s proposal and did nor require all employers to pay for a share of their workers’ health premiums. (Hartford Courant, 9/23/94; 10/7/94)

During Patients’ Bill of Rights negotiations, Lieberman argued against permitting patients to sue HMOs for punitive damages. He was a cosponsor of a moderate plan that did not allow patients to sue their HMOs or other managed care plans for unlimited damages in both state and federal courts. Connecticut columnist David Morse wrote about Lieberman, “He has also opposed medical insurance reform, except in watered-down industry-friendly versions.” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 7/30/98; San Francisco Chronicle, 8/23/00)

Contributions since 1999:

Date Contributor Amount
3/9/05 USAA Employee PAC $1,000
9/29/05 USAA Employee PAC $1,000
3/15/06 PCIPAC $2,500
9/22/05 PCIPAC $2,000
3/6/06 Mass Mutual PAC $1,000
3/18/04 Phoenix Companies Inc PAC $1,000
7/8/04 Phoenix Companies Inc PAC $1,000
7/15/06 Phoenix Companies Inc PAC $1,000
3/21/05 Aetna Inc PAC $1,000
3/15/06 Aetna Inc PAC $4,000
7/11/04 Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assoc PAC $1,000
6/2/05 Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assoc PAC $2,000
3/21/06 Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assoc PAC $2,000
6/30/05 AFLAC PAC $1,000
7/9/06 AFLAC PAC $2,500
11/7/00 Aid Association for Lutherns Employees $500
9/11/05 Albheers Insurance Company PAC $1,000
6/30/04 American Council of Life Insurers PAC $1,000
3/18/05 American Council of Life Insurers PAC $1,000
9/22/05 American Council of Life Insurers PAC $1,000
9/25/05 American Insurance Association PAC $1,000
3/18/05 American International Group PAC $1,000
3/18/05 American International Group PAC $4,000
3/30/05 American International Group PAC $2,000
4/25/06 American International Group PAC $2,000
5/3/00 Americans Council of Life Insurance PC $1,000
5/3/00 Americans Council of Life Insurance PC $500
6/2/00 Chubb PAC $1,000
2/26/99 Cigna Corp PAC $2,000
3/15/99 Cigna Corp PAC $10,000
5/26/99 Cigna Corp PAC $1,000
11/5/99 Cigna Corp PAC $1,000
1/26/00 Cigna Corp PAC $1,000
5/18/00 Cigna Corp PAC $1,000
5/18/00 Cigna Corp PAC $1,000
3/18/05 Cigna Corp PAC $1,000
5/23/05 Cigna Corp PAC $2,000
3/14/06 Cigna Corp PAC $500
3/14/06 Cigna Corp PAC $2,000
5/25/05 Council of Insurances Agents/Brokers PAC $1,000
9/11/05 Council of Insurances Agents/Brokers PAC $1,000
3/28/00 Equitable Life Assurance Society PAC $1,000
3/21/06 Genworth Financial PAC $2,500
3/21/00 Independent Insurance Agents of America $1,000
6/21/00 Independent Insurance Agents of America $880
7/11/04 InsurPAC $1,000
6/2/05 InsurPAC $1,000
9/30/05 InsurPAC $1,000
9/28/05 Liberty Mutual Insurance PAC $2,000
3/17/05 Metlife PAC $1,000
8/4/05 Metlife PAC $1,000
5/5/00 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company PAC $1,000
5/5/00 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company PAC $1,000
6/13/00 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company PAC $500
6/13/00 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company PAC $500
11/17/99 Mutual of Omaha Companies PAC $2,000
9/25/05 National Assoc Insurance & Financial Aid $3,000
6/2/00 New York Life PAC $1,000
6/2/00 New York Life PAC $1,000
9/13/00 New York Life PAC $1,000
9/1/04 New York Life PAC $1,000
3/9/05 New York Life PAC $1,000
8/19/05 New York Life PAC $500
8/31/05 New York Life PAC $3,000
3/14/06 New York Life PAC $2,500
3/18/05 Northwestern Mutual & Life Pac $1,000
11/17/98 Phoenix Home Life PAC $1,000
2/29/00 Phoenix Home Life PAC $500
5/2/05 St Paul Travelers Companies Inc PAC $3,820
5/2/05 St Paul Travelers Companies Inc PAC $3,679
5/18/05 St Paul Travelers Companies Inc PAC $320
3/21/06 St Paul Travelers Companies Inc PAC $1,000
8/2/04 St. Paul Travelers Companies Inc PAC $1,000
7/11/04 The Hartford PAC $1,000
6/8/05 The Hartford PAC $5,000
5/18/05 Unitedhealth Group Inc PAC $2,000
3/21/06 Unitedhealth Group Inc PAC $1,000
2/2/05 W.R. Berkley Corporation PAC $5,000
9/11/05 Zurich Holdings Co of America PAC $1,000
11/17/98 Hartford Advocate Fund $1,000
3/30/05 Prudential PAC $1,000
TOTAL $126,199

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